Part Two: Eating Disorder Treatment and Recovery

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Chief Clinical Officer Doug Bunnell, PhD, CEDS is an expert clinican and leader in the eating disorder field. He is passionate about research and the latest advancements in the field, and equally committed to individualized client care. In this week’s blog post, Dr. Bunnell shares part two of an overview of treatment and recovery and how Monte Nido & Affiliates supports clients along their path to full recovery. 

Transitions to Day Treatment (DTP) and Intensive Outpatient (IOP)

These programs are intensive group based therapy programs. Eating disorders are serious, potentially chronic and life threatening illnesses, requiring your full focus. It is essential that each patient make a full commitment to attend all scheduled sessions. Our experience shows that patients and families who make their treatment and recovery their primary focus have the best outcomes.

Many patients who begin treatment of their eating disorder in outpatient therapy may require higher levels of care as their treatment progresses. Patients often need more structure to support them in their nutritional and psychological recovery. As their need for structure and support decreases, patients can step down to lower levels of care. The research on the treatment course of patients with anorexia nervosa indicates that many patients will require some degree of psychotherapeutic treatment for two years or more.

It is important for you and your family to look at the full course of recovery. Many insurance policies cover only an acute phase of treatment, whereas the clinical, or treatment, recommendations are more likely to address the issues involved in maximizing the chances for full recovery. The gap between covered care and recommended care, between medically necessary care and clinically indicated care, is important to consider as you plan for your, or your child’s, treatment needs.

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 


Part One: Eating Disorder Treatment & Recovery

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Monte Nido & Affiliates Chief Clinical Officer Doug Bunnell, PhD, CEDS is an expert clinican and leader in the eating disorder field. He is passionate about research and the latest advancements in the field, and equally committed to individualized client care. In this week’s blog post, Dr. Bunnell shares an part one of an overview of treatment and recovery and how Monte Nido & Affiliates supports clients along their path to full recovery. 

Eating disorders are complex illnesses with biological, genetic, psychological, social and developmental roots. There is never a single cause for someone’s eating disorder and effective treatment must address this entire range of factors.

The treatment of eating disorders is equally complex. It involves a number of different treatment disciplines, and usually a number of different levels of care. Effective treatment and recovery involves an ongoing collaboration between patients, their families and loved ones, and clinicians. Families, especially for younger women with eating disorders, are essential partners in the treatment team.

Treatment teams often include:

Physicians and psychiatrists

Psychotherapists

Individual, Family, Group

Experiential therapists

Art, movement

Nutritionists

Nurses, Educational consultants, …..(residential)

Levels of care include:

Residential

Day Treatment and Transitional Living

Extended Care

Outpatient Day Treatment

Intensive Outpatient

Outpatient Individual, Family, Group, Nutritional and Psychiatric therapies

Recovery takes place in phases or steps. Monte Nido & Affiliates’ continuum of care provides a way to gradually move from a highly structured and intensive residential treatment program to increasingly less structured levels of care. The transitions between levels of care are important moments in the process of recovery but this gradual “step-down” process helps minimize the risk for relapse.

A patient’s motivation to recover is a critical element in the recovery process. Healing and motivation are sustained and nurtured through involvement in a community. The Renfrew treatment approach stresses these essential connections. As patients gradually regain their physical and nutritional health, treatment begins to focus on other aspects of successful recovery such as self esteem and broader aspects of the quality of life.

Most patients will fully recover from their eating disorders. Full recovery, however, often takes considerable time and effort. Patients with anorexia nervosa who are able to restore their weight to healthy levels have a much lower relapse risk than those who regain some, but not all, of their lost weight. Patients with bulimia nervosa who are able to completely eliminate their binge and purge behaviors have a lower risk of relapse than those who continue with even sporadic episodes.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Part Three: Don’t Look in My Lunchbox! An Open Letter to all teachers, coaches, school personnel, educators, parents, and frankly, everyone, everywhere…

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Clementine Advisory Board Member Cherie Monarch conludes her important letter from a mother’s perspective in this week’s blog post. Cherie continues with an “open letter to all teachers, coaches, school personnel, educators, parents, and frankly, everyone, everywhere”.  

10 Things you need to know before you speak (read 1-4 HERE and 5-7 HERE).

8. Even if your words do not trigger my child to have an eating disorder or disordered eating, they may haunt them for the rest of their life. They may burden my child with thoughts every time they take a bite … they may question every food choice. They may analyze  every bite they take, every meal they choose, for the rest of their life. Your instruction may make my child afraid to eat wheat, chips, cookies, ice cream, or other foods they used to love and were celebratory. Please consider your words carefully. Please don’t make my child afraid of birthday cupcakes!  

9. As my child’s mother, I know best what to pack in my child’s lunchbox. There are reasons my child’s lunchbox contains the foods it does. My choices may be driven by medical, mental, or financial needs. If you have questions regarding the food in my child’s lunchbox please contact me directly. Please do not discuss this with my child or shame them.

10. It is important that my child eat the lunch I have packed. If you notice my child is consistently not eating their lunch, is giving their lunch to other students, or is throwing it away or you have concerns regarding the amount of food my child is eating, please contact me directly. There may be a serious health concern. Please do not address this with my child. Please do not comment on the amount of food they are/are not eating. I count on you to be my eyes and ears when my child is at school.

I encourage you in the future to NOT monitor any child’s lunch or food choice. To reconsider and re-examine any school-based, anti-obesity, healthy living campaigns. To consider the fact that there is little research on the effectiveness of these programs. Is the potential risk of harmful effects on children’s physical and mental health and adoption of unhealthy behaviors worth the potential gain?

So, before you speak, please think carefully about your words. You see, my child respects you. They look up to you as their teacher. Imposing your beliefs and your nutritional needs on my child may compromise their health and mental state. Please teach them that all foods fill a need – always nutritional, sometimes celebratory and always nurturing.

Please understand, I know your intentions are pure and good. For that I will be forever grateful. But in the future I would appreciate it if you do not monitor my child’s lunchbox. Please leave that to me, their mother. I know their nutritional and emotional needs better than anyone.

Warm regards,

Mothers Everywhere

P.S. This article is not about monitoring lunch boxes because a child in the class may have an inadequate food supply in their lunch box or may have life-threatening food allergies. It is about the negative food talk happening in classrooms and lunchrooms, and how it affects our children. It is about food judgments and how programs that are intended to promote health sometimes have big unintended consequences.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.