Part One: If It Were Cancer…

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Clementine Advisory Board Member Cherie Monarch shares an important series highlighting the seriousness of struggling with an eating disorder. In part one, Cherie begins with a conversation she had with a dear friend who recently found out a loved one was diagnosed with cancer…

To all patients, parents, families, friends, providers, clinicians, teachers, coaches, school personnel, and frankly, everyone, everywhere who has or knows someone with an eating disorder…

Cancer.

It is one word.

One single word.

A powerful word.

When spoken, it’s a word that immediately elicits compassion, empathy, support, understanding, and action. It is one word that immediately garners the support of family, friends, a team of physicians, and will compel people to start walks, fundraisers, galas, go fund me’s, meal support, etc. Cancer will mandate that there be an army of warriors surrounding the family and patient as they walk this journey. And it should.

Cancer. A longtime friend recently posted this on his home page. His daughter is battling cancer. Of course, it immediately elicited my empathy and understanding. Offers of how can I help?

My friend is aware that our family had a loved one that struggled with an eating disorder. He understood that as a parent that this was the worst possible thing that could have ever happened to me. That I would have gladly taken the place of my daughter. That I would have given anything to bear her pain and suffering.  He understood that my journey of a child with a life-threatening illness was worse than my own two open-heart surgeries.

I messaged him and offered support. I shared how very sorry I was for what his daughter and his family were enduring. That I can’t imagine how difficult CANCER has been for them.

I was blown away.  What I was not prepared for was his reply…

“Actually you don’t have to imagine watching your child go through something like this. You lived it. Different disease but just just as deadly, and probably more difficult to treat. The leukemia my daughter has has a very well developed treatment protocol, that is used throughout the entire country, and there is constant collaboration between all of the treatment centers. I know that is not the same with eating disorders. Hell, you still have to fight to get it recognized as a disease, and not just some “silly little girl who won’t eat.” To me your battle seems harder.”

My conversation with my friend caused me to do a lot of reflection. Having a loved one battling an eating disorder is much like battling cancer. It is one of the most challenging and most difficult journeys of our life. Some of us may be battling to get a diagnosis; others of us may have been given a diagnosis but are trying to understand what’s happening.

The difference with eating disorders is …No one is provided with a handbook on how to heal your loved one from an eating disorder. Follow this protocol. Instead we’re left with minimal guidance, minimal support, lots of questions, no direction, a lot of confusion, and no respite care. There are conflicting messages everywhere.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


What Do Ballistic Missile Threats Have to do with Gratitude and Self-Care?

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Becky Henry is trained as a Certified, Professional Co-Active Coach (CPCC) and uses those skills to guide families to let go of fear and panic, learn self-care skills and become effective guides for their loved one in eating disorder recovery. In this week’s post, Becky discusses the healing benefits of gratitude.

Some of you know that I was in Hawaii in January 2018 when the State of Hawaii issued this warning to cell phones on all Hawaiian islands:

Different people react differently to threatening situations. I have, so far observed different approaches and all have various and numerous causes I’m sure. There must be a study somewhere on this…right Kitty Westin?

  1. Stand firmly in DENIAL and go on with our lives – if the threat remains just that.
  2. Walk around completely unaware.
  3. Sheer and total panic rendering the person incapacitated.
  4. Absolute Terror and action.
  5. Fatalistic approach…we are all going to die and it doesn’t matter what we do.

I have experienced most of the above at different times. This time it was #4! I was the most terrified I have ever been in my life. While others were standing at the oceanside blissfully unaware or fatalistically accepting…I don’t know which, I was preparing to die a long slow painful death and attempting to possibly save my own life.

After 3 bliss-filled weeks on the island of Kauai, I got up and watched one of the most beautiful sunrises I’d seen there. Then my husband left for his daily yoga class (during which he did not learn about the missile warning) and I settled in for a relaxing Saturday morning of looking for potential places to stay next year….haha…might just stay in Minnesota out of range of such attacks.

The warning arrived on my phone and after some frantic scurrying around and searching (along with thousands of others) “How to Survive a Ballistic Missile Attack” on the internet and found an article on Business Insider , I began preparing to try and survive inside while fallout rained down.

In addition to shutting windows, blinds and doors (yes it got very warm very quickly) and filling every container I could find with water, I called my mom in Minnesota to say, “Goodbye.”

During all of this my mind was going a million miles an hour; “Will I ever see any loved ones again? Will Jay stay put at the yoga studio? Will we die instantly or be sickened by fallout? Where are Jay’s passwords? How long with the food in the fridge be safe to eat? Will I run out of water? How will I tell my daughter what was happening? And a thousand scarier thoughts.

While talking to my mom; who was in reaction #1 above, I looked on Twitter and thankfully saw the Governor’s message that this was a mistake…never in those minutes did I envision this potential outcome! We were still going to be healthy, safe, able to eat safe food and drink clean water and breathe clean air!! And see our loved ones again!

Gratitude barely begins to describe how grateful I felt then and still do. It was a mind bender. About 30 minutes of sheer terror and sadness and suddenly back to normal. My good friend in Chicago helped me breathe over the phone until my husband returned. He was in a state of yoga bliss and didn’t even know what had happened…Guess that says a lot about the benefits of yoga, but that’s another article. Check out what Forbes has to say about scientific benefits of GRATITUDE!

After calming down I went to see the waves at the lighthouse with my friends who were also visiting the island from Minnesota. They had watched a football game while this was going on. Both had grown up with air-raid drills and weren’t phased at all. Blew me away, this wasn’t a drill, but they had learned to not trust these things. It was surreal to be outside breathing clean, safe air and watching the waves and whales after thinking my life as I knew it was over…talk about second chances!

The next day as I watched another gorgeous sunrise I was
filled with gratitude and joy! I had thought I may never see
another sunrise…that whole day I walked around in
amazement at all that I still had. Clean air, clean water to
drink, safe food to eat and a healthy body still. This was
amazing. Weeks later I am still incredibly grateful for all of these things.

One of the self-care tools I teach to parents of kids with eating disorders is to practice gratitude. Often parents will tell me there is nothing to be grateful for when they have a child at death’s door. Being grateful for clean air, clean water, enough food and good health are some of the things I’ve suggested that they feel gratitude about. It’s hard to grasp what a powerful antidote to suffering that gratitude can be.

It takes doing it regularly to get into the habit of practicing gratitude so that it can become a go-to tool to cope with all that eating disorders challenge a parent with on a daily basis. This is why we teach how to practice gratitude during the self-care training at the SHIFT HAPPENS Retreats. The next one is September 22-25 – in the Mid-Atlantic Region for all of the East Coast folks who’ve been after me to host a retreat out there, watch my website for updates.

I would love to hear what you are grateful for, how you practice gratitude and what it shifts for you. Please share your comments. Thanks!

Still not convinced that gratitude can reduce your distress while being the caregiver of someone with an eating disorder? Check out the “7 Scientifically Proven Benefits of Gratitude” published in Psychology Today in 2015.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

 


Part One: Feeding Our Warrior Daughters

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Clementine adolescent treatment programs Director of Nutrition Services Amanda Mellowspring, MS, RD/N, CEDRD-S is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian with over a decade of experience in program development and clinical application working with eating disorders at various levels of care. In this week’s blog post, Amanda shares the importance of empowering adolescents in eating disorder recovery process, and just how Clementine supports adolescents to do so. 

In the treatment of adult women, we often hold discussion on these powerful women being “warriors” in recovery, having overcome the trials of an eating disorder and likely other hardships.

In my work with adolescent girls, I often hear others comment on how “sweet” the work of our younger girls must be by comparison, or sometimes even how “sad” it must be to see our younger girls’ struggle. In response, I must say that these girls are the truest warriors – a path less refined by age but sometimes with just as many battle marks.

So, how do we empower our adolescent girls to be warriors in their recovery while also holding space for them to stay at a developmentally-appropriate place in their life and recovery work? One of the ways that we manage this at Clementine Programs is to strike a fine balance in our work with food. Feeding our warrior daughters is a mighty task!

In order to achieve this balance, we support our girls in feeding themselves with foods they enjoy, nourishing themselves with a variety of foods, and support them in re-engaging with internal awareness of hunger, fullness, and satiety. The combination of these empowering messages of personal safety with food and body trust, alongside the structure of guidance around quantity, food flexibility, and normalized developmental experiences of food exposure and trials allow for a firmly rooted warrior of recovery.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Article Spotlight

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Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

 

10 Things People With Anxiety Need to Do Every Day Psych Central

How I’m Living My Best Life with Mental Illness This Year The Mighty

What to do When Your Child is at College and Tells you They Have an Eating Disorder More Love

MythBusters: The Binge Eating Disorder Edition Proud2BeMe

6 Turning Points That Were Essential To My Recovery Recovery Warriors 

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Part Two: An Inside Look Into Treatment at Clementine

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Dr. Lauren Ozbolt, MD, CEDS, FAPA is a board certified Adult, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist who specializes in the evidence-based treatment of mood, anxiety and eating disorders. She currently serves as the Medical Director for Monte Nido & Affiliates. In part two of her series, Dr. Ozbolt continues to share an inside look into a day in treatment at Clementine adolescent treatment programs.

While our adolescents are quite busy in programming throughout the day, we also recognize the need and benefit of appropriately scheduled breaks and downtime. Downtime is often difficult for our adolescents in that unstructured time allows the eating disorder thoughts more freedom. At Clementine, downtime is interspersed with opportunities for relationship building, recreational time and fun. Our recovery coaches are no strangers to fun and it is not unusual to see them engaged with the girls in an intense game of banana-grams or an elaborate art project.

 One aspect unique to Clementine is our use of a multi-dimensional Level System. Upon admission, adolescents are assigned to Level I, which corresponds with certain goals, assignments, challenges and privileges. When these goals and challenges are met (determined by the treatment team and milieu), then the adolescent advances to the next level of challenges and privileges. By using this system, the adolescent, parents and treatment team are all clear about the client’s progression in treatment. This eliminates uncertainty on the part of the adolescent, fosters mastery and facilitates trust.

After a full day of clinical programing, meal support and countless opportunities to practice recovery-oriented choices, adolescents are ready for bed. Recovery coaches are present to support bedtime routines and prepare for lights out. Recognizing that separation from parents and loved ones can be difficult for adolescents, Clementine staff are there to comfort and encourage. It is only at night, when your daughter feels safe, supported and loved that our job for the day is complete. It is perhaps in these quiet moments, that the beauty of the Clementine program is most visible.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


What Do I Say to My Child Away in Eating Disorder Treatment?

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Becky Henry is trained as a Certified, Professional Co-Active Coach (CPCC) and uses those skills to guide families to let go of fear and panic, learn self-care skills and become effective guides for their loved one in eating disorder recovery. In this week’s blog post, Becky shares valuable tips of what to say to your child who is away in eating disorder treatment. 

Your child has been away at a treatment center for about a week – maybe just 3-4 days and you get THE CALL! Your child, weeping or crying hysterically on the other end. “MOM! Help get me out of this place! They’re so mean to me!”

First, I am so sorry that this illness takes away our real kids from us. And I’m so sorry that no one gave you help in how to respond.

What do you say?  Hopefully the treatment center gave you a heads up that this is very COMMON.

Your job, once you’ve prepared yourself to be calm, rational and objective is to hang in there. Knowing this is VERY normal as the team is challenging the eating disorder (ED) a lot right now makes it very scary for your child. ED’s voice is VERY loud right now.

Keep loving him/her where he/she is at. Trust the model. Remind him/her that he/she is safe and that this is part of the process.  Remind him/her to lean on the staff when he/she needs support, that is what they are there for. Tell him/her she is brave. Acknowledge how scary and hard this is for him/her. Tell him/her you will always love him/her and be there for him/her. And that he/she can do this – one step at a time.

It might be useful to have something like this by your phone (or in your phone):

“Honey, I’m so sorry, it sounds so very hard and scary. I’m so proud of you for working so hard. I know. I love you. It will get easier. uh huh. yeah. WOW. Bummer. That sounds really scary. I know you can do this. Please remember to take one moment at a time. I love you.” 

And then repeat it each time he/she calls.

Know that ED is fighting for his very existence and is not going to give up easily.  When ED feels threatened he ups the ante.  This is what your child is up against. He/she needs you to be strong and not back down.

Then it won’t shred you to bits. As much. Loving a child is painful sometimes. Keep loving your child where they are at. Even when you want your child healthy and back home with you. For now you can do this.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Sea Glass Grant: Recovered Living

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At Monte Nido & Affiliates, we save lives while providing the opportunity for people to realize their healthy selves. One of the ways we want to help provide opportunities for individuals to realize their healthy selves is through our Sea Glass Grants opportunity. We are excited to share our newest Sea Glass Grant recipient, Recovered Living, an organization providing coaching to those who aren’t able to obtain support in underserved locations, providing both in-person support and online. Read more about this amazing organization below! 

How did Recovered Living come about?

My own recovery experience inspired me to create a service for people who did not have access to face-to-face support.

After flying home to to New Zealand after 7 months with Monte Nido I realized the ‘Treatment Bubble’ had well and truly burst. The nearest eating disorder therapist was 6 hours drive away so I knew if I wanted to stay in recovery, I needed to get creative in finding a team.

I found a therapist and a dietician that worked online and figured out that lunchtime in New Zealand was dinnertime in California. I would Skype with my recovery friends at mealtimes and in this way created my own virtual IOP. No matter where I was in New Zealand, my entire team was at my fingertips via my laptop.  This is how I recovered.

In my recovery journey I saw many people relapse and even die as a direct result of lack of available treatment options. I became determined to bridge the gap for people who did not have access to face-to-face support and create something different that addressed the gap.

How has Recovered Living helped you in your recovery journey?

Recovered Living was a dream of mine years before it was a reality. When recovery was tough for me or the temptation to go back to my eating disorder was strong, I would remind myself that I couldn’t be a role model for others if I went back to my eating disorder. Helping others and being a leader in the recovery field was a very strong motivator for my recovery.

Who is Recovered Living? 

Recovered Living is 100% Kristie at the minute! I often refer to Recovered Living as ‘we’…because it truly has a life-force of its own. I have my Kristie life and there is another being in my life called Recovered Living that I am in relationship with.

It is getting close to the time that I need another coach to help meet demand – Recovered Living will soon be ‘us’!

What feeling do you most associate with Recovered Living?

Only one?  Hope. The most important thing in the world. Inspiration. Authenticity & Effervescence!

Walk me through the Recovered Living process, how do people currently hear about the services you provide?

Recovered Living provides two distinct services.

Transition Assistance is a 24/7 service where a Recovery Coach will move into a clients home to help them transition. This can be moving from Residential to PHP, from School to Home…or anything in between. When the Recovery Coach leaves, they can continue supporting clients via online sessions.  With such a detailed insight into Client’s lives, we have noticed people’s recovery wobbles are more like a dance move than a dive.

The other service Recovered Living provides is online Meal and Snack Support, Recovery Coaching and At-Home Cooking Sessions. This means we have clients all across America, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Europe.

We recently started a free online ‘Support Space’ group for family and friends of Recovered Living clients. An eating disorder does not just affect one person in the family, it affects every person in the family. We believe families deserve support too!

People have found Recovered Living from all over – we get lots of people from Google searches, word of mouth referrals or from our social media platforms. Something we always offer clients is the opportunity to talk with us first, before making any commitments. We will connect via video call with any new client to hear their story and to talk about how we can help them move forward in recovery. If we seem like a good fit and you want to move ahead – we will design a support schedule that works for your individual needs. We are available nights AND weekends – we get that recovery operates outside office hours – so do we!

What is your favorite part of the day-to-day start up process?

It is not one moment that is my favorite so much as the feeling of a driving and vibrant passion inside me. Sometimes I get so excited I don’t want to close my eyes at night!!

How can people get involved?

If you think Recovered Living is a service that could help someone you know, please spread the word!  We have a Facebook and Instagram account, as well as a monthly blog (you can sign up for our newsletter on the website).

Have spare time on your hands? We currently have volunteer opportunities available to help get an upcoming project off the ground. We always welcome support!!!

What advice would you give to someone in their recovery who has a dream?

Do it!  Something that helped me in recovery was the mantra, ‘bigger jeans, bigger life’…now I say ‘bigger dreams, bigger life’!   

What are your hopes and dreams for Recovered Living?

I hope Recovered Living reaches every corner of the world that has access to the internet.

I dream of a time where treatment for people will be affordable, help is available and support is practical.  No matter where you live.

I hope Recovered Living helps to promote the benefits of telemedicine, giving rise to the critical mass that is creating a change in treatment options.

I dream of the client that will one day become a Coach. The client that follows their calling and becomes the person they wish they had in their recovery – themselves.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


When Emotion Mind Wreaks Havoc on our Behaviors

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Clementine Briarcliff Manor Primary Therapist Dana Sedlak, LCSW discusses the progression of “emotion mind” to “wise mind” in eating disorder treatment. In this week’s blog post, Dana explains how our emotions are directly tied to our behaviors and some strategies used to support clients in recognizing and moving past maladpative behaviors.

One of the most difficult parts of treatment involves identifying and understanding one’s thoughts and feelings. This can be more challenging for those with eating disorders whose function has served as a numbing agent for several unwanted emotions. It has become natural and sometimes habitual to dismiss feelings in order to feel in control. Through DBT (Dialectical Behavior Therapy), teenagers are introduced to the idea of Distress Tolerance: Unfortunately, pain is a part of life and therefore one must learn how to manage difficult emotions.

Many teenagers speak to having an increase of emotions once they begin completing their meal plan in treatment. We often wonder whether they are experiencing more emotions due to many of their eating disorder behaviors decreasing or because they are becoming more connected to themselves and others due to the therapeutic process. Despite the reasoning behind this, the increase in emotions is extremely uncomfortable for them. They often report feeling easily overwhelmed by these emotions with little confidence in coping with them. The danger in this scenario is that without intervention, emotion mind leads right back to use of destructive behaviors. They then become stuck in what often feels like an endless cycle.

The beginning of this cycle includes a precipitating event that is identified as the trigger. This could be anything from a death of a loved one to getting a poor grade on a test. One’s emotions then start to bubble up, including depression, desperation, anxiety, and worthlessness. Shortly after these emotions then turn into thoughts that become fueled by these emotions. “I can’t deal with this anymore” and “I’m so dumb, I might as well just stop trying” are prime examples of these emotion-driven thoughts based on the triggering event. As we know from CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy), the thoughts also quickly turn into behaviors. This is where one’s eating disorder and co-morbid illnesses take hold. Restricting, binging, purging, over-exercising, self-harming, and other similar behaviors serve as protective measures that protect one’s ego/self-esteem in order to avoid these thoughts and emotions.

Once the behaviors have initially subsided, consequences are likely to appear. This could occur in either the short or long-term, but often results in loss of freedom, relationship problems, health problems, or a worsening of symptoms. Emotion mind revs up and creates more feelings of depression, anxiety, being overwhelmed, and an increase in shame because of these consequences. These emotions now feel intolerable again and one resorts back to what she thinks works: Covering up these emotions through more behaviors.  Before she is even aware, she becomes stuck in this cycle of suffering all over again.

The goal through DBT is to intervene at the beginning stages of this destructive pattern. It is vital in recovery for one to be able to appropriately identify and feel one’s emotions. It makes sense for someone to feel sadness after a death or anxiety after doing poorly on a test. We never want to invalidate this part of the experience. What we would like to change comes in-between the negative thoughts and the behavior use. At this point in the cycle, one must learn to challenge her thoughts and then seek self-soothing coping behaviors to gain the same sense of protection and security that the eating disorder often creates. This can come in the form of one’s five senses of sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste. Go outside in nature, listen to your favorite song, smell a candle of a scent that brings you peace, take a warm bath or shower, or sip on your favorite drink.

Through continued intervention and practice, emotion mind will mold into wise mind where one no longer needs to use the eating disorder to manage and push away the emotions. Instead, one has gained the courage to face the emotions as they are. By breaking this cycle, one becomes vulnerable enough to know and believe that she is completely capable of working through any emotion that arises. It is then that one can begin to slowly and surely let go of the old destructive behaviors that no longer serve the same purpose.

 

References: “Out-of Control: A Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)-Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Workbook for Getting Control of Our Emotions and Emotion-Driven Behavior”

 

We are exited to share the opening of Clementine Malibu Lake. Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 


Supporting Eating Disorder Recovery Through the Holidays

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Clementine Briarcliff Manor Registered Dietitian Megan Fahey, MS, RD, CDN discusses eating disorder recovery through the holidays in this week’s blog post. Megan outlines tips to offer you or your loved one support around the holiday table.

It is once again the most wonderful (and stressful) time of year! Along with shopping, decorating and gift giving, cooking and baking are included on the never-ending to-do list. From Thanksgiving dinner through New Year’s celebrations, food undeniably plays a central role at holiday gatherings. For an individual struggling with an eating disorder, or working to maintain recovery from one, the overwhelming focus on eating can take away from celebratory experiences with family and friends. The following are tips to offer you or your loved one support around the holiday table.

Plan Ahead.

Schedule holiday plans in advance in order to make any necessary adjustments to your meal plan. Gather details on the location and timing of each event, as well as the type of food served. Work with your dietitian prior to a holiday party to create a balanced plate from the dishes that will be available. Focus on incorporating a variety of textures, colors and flavors to enjoy. Keeping in line with a 3 meal + 3 snack meal plan model, try selecting appetizers or desserts for one or more of your “snacks” to normalize your style of eating for the holidays. If you or your loved one have food allergies or dietary restrictions, be sure to collaborate with the hostess and bring alternative dishes as needed. Although the meal plan is a tool to help you navigate decisions around food at the table, it is important to maintain flexibility around timing of eating and selection of food. Becoming attuned to your physical body will ultimately shift your focus away from an external meal plan. Eating disorder recovery is possible when you provide yourself permission to nourish yourself based on your body’s internal cues and desires.

Ask for Support.

This is a time of year to connect with those around us. Open up to a trusted family member or friend to communicate whatever support you may need to follow your established meal plan. Identify particular food behaviors you are working on and explain how your “ally” can best support you at the table. Maybe you need a second set of eyes assessing your portion sizes, or someone to pace with you during the meal. It may be stepping aside before and/or after the meal to briefly process your emotions and check in with your hunger / fullness levels. Eating disordered thoughts and urges are isolating, even when surrounded by a room full of people. Reach out and ask someone to help you process the emotion of the holiday to help resist eating disorder urges before, during and after the meal.

Be Mindful.

Mindfulness practices such as deep breathing will activate the parasympathetic nervous system and ease the muscles of the digestive tract. Your mindset while eating impacts not only the quantity of food you consume, but also how well your body is able to digest and absorb the nutrients present in the meal. Take a moment before the first bite to place both feet on the floor and take a few deep breaths to help calm your nervous system and ground yourself at the table. Although it sounds simple, mindful breathing will restore oxygen to the brain, helping you think clearly and make more effective decisions.

Create New Traditions.

It is not uncommon for holiday discussion to revolve around food, often times referencing the “good” or “bad” qualities of each component of the meal. This can be especially triggering to hear if you are working to establish a more nourishing relationship with food and your body. Although it is not possible control the attitudes of those around you, try introducing games or music at your family gathering to help shift the focus from food talk to interpersonal connection. Set a goal to interact with family members in a different way by engaging in conversation around shared interests or offering non-appearance related complements to at least 3 people. Remember that most people experience some level of anxiety at holiday gatherings and may also benefit from creating new traditions for the day.

Give to Yourself. 

During this season of giving, it is extremely important to tend to your own needs. There is such a beautiful energy in the spirit of the holidays, which can be overshadowed by your anxiety around food and eating. Create time in your schedule for self-care, incorporating relaxing activities to balance social holiday events. Implement a gratitude practice to connect with the abundance of your life. You have worked so hard on this journey of eating disorder recovery and are inherently worthy of experiencing all of the joy of the holiday season.

 

Clementine invites you to an open house celebration for our newest location, Clementine Malibu Lake, opening in December, on November 30th at 5pm! Learn more here

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


The Tipping Point in the Pursuit of Health: Clinical Assessment and Treatment of Orthorexia Nervosa and Exercise Addiction

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Join Oliver-Pyatt Centers, Clementine Adolescent Treatment Programs and T.H.E. Center for Disordered Eating of Western North Carolina for “The Tipping Point in the Pursuit of Health: Clinical Assessment and Treatment of Orthorexia Nervosa and Exercise Addiction” with Director of Clinical Programming Jamie Morris, MS, LMHC, CEDS-S.

Exercise and nutrition are foundational to good health, but extreme behaviors can be warning signs indicating unhealthy behaviors. Proper assessment and treatment are key in preventing these behaviors from becoming life-interfering and, in some cases, health harming. Through this workshop, participants will come away with an understanding of orthorexia, its definition and the controversy surrounding the term. Similarly, exercise addiction will be defined and assessment measures will be reviewed. The presenter will address the cognitive and behavioral similarities between orthorexia and exercise addiction and participants can expect to receive practical clinical interventions. The presentation will also address how cultural and social reinforcements impose challenges in the treatment of these disorders.

Participants will be able to:
1. Define the term orthorexia and understand the history of this disorder
2. Define the difference between compulsive and excessive exercise and name assessment measures that can be used
3. Name two validated measures that can be administered to assess eating and exercise behavior

The presentation will be held on November 17th from 10:00am – 12:00pm at The Center for Disordered Eating Office in Asheville, North Carolina. Two CE Credits Provided: PhD, PsyD, LMFT, LPCC, LMHC, LMSW, LCSW, RD

To RSVP, please reach out to Regional Outreach Manager Jamie Singleteary: jsingleteary@montenidoaffiliates.com