Article Spotlight

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Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

5 Ways Health Education Can Better Portray Living with an Eating Disorder NEDA

Supporting a Friend Fresh Out of Eating Disorder Recovery Eating Disorder Hope

Meditation as the Foundation for Overall Health and Well-Being Huffington Post

What You Need to Know About Stress and Self-Care Psychology Today

Taking Care of Yourself When Your Child Has an Eating Disorder More Love

To the Men and the Boys Who are Struggling with an Eating Disorder Huffington Post

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Monte Nido & Affiliates Trauma Protocol

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Individuals struggling with the aftermath of a traumatic experience require an effective protocol ensuring long lasting results. It is important to specifically ask treatment centers to provide detailed descriptions of their trauma protocol and how they offer this important and sensitive support. At Monte Nido & Affiliates, we offer a clear methodology that will treat trauma patients with care, compassion and practices that work.

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is the chosen model we use at our locations because it has strong empirical research and outcomes. This type of therapy is manualized but still leaves room for flexibility based on the patient’s needs. Features of this treatment include targeting perceived cognitive distortions and challenging the patient through socratic questioning. This type of questioning allows patients to reach conclusions themselves and promotes inner reflection. Somatic experiences, such as mindfulness and yoga, are incorporated into the program as well, although it is not our direct method for treating trauma. The CPT process is also integrated with other modalities such as Dialectal Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

At every location that offers this programming, there is a trained staff member on call. These treatment plans are administered through certified therapists that have undergone extensive training by Dr. Patricia Resick. She has administered national two-day training programs at locations in Malibu, Miami and Briarcliff. Additionally, Dr. Resick continues to check in with supervision calls with the clinicians at our locations to ensure each patient is receiving the best care possible.

Knowing your loved one is struggling with the aftermath of a traumatic experience can be a devastating process and we are here to help ease your pain. If you are ready to take a step toward healing, please visit our admissions page here.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


The Sun and Wind Dispute: Navigating Motivation and Readiness for Change in Adolescents with Eating Disorders

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Clementine Miami Pinecrest Clinical Director Bertha Tavarez, PsyD discusses treating an adolescent who is resistant and treatment ambivalent. Dr. Tavarez offers some strategies to help strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the groundwork necessary for full recovery. 

“The sun and the wind were having a dispute as to who was more powerful. They saw a man walking along and they had a bet as to which of them would get him to remove his coat. The wind started first and blew up a huge gale, the coat flapped but the man only fastened the buttons and tightened up his belt. The sun tried next and shone brightly making the man sweat. He took off his coat.” – Anonymous

The metaphor of the sun and the wind is an accurate depiction of the challenges that many clinicians face while working with adolescent patients. Although we may have access to the gravity of our patient’s clinical needs, simply communicating our concerns and providing much needed skills can be met with resistance. Our patients remain “locked in” to their emotional experience while simultaneously feeling “locked out” of the insight and motivation needed to increase their receptivity to much needed skills development. The adolescent, preoccupied with exerting and maintaining control and autonomy, may hold tightly to their coat, rendering our intentions to provide care futile.

So how do we, like the sun, create shifts in awareness and influence change?

The power of reflection

It may be tempting to adopt the roll of cheerleader (“You can do this!”) or problem solver (“Why don’t you try this?”). When an adolescent patient presents with resistant talk (“I don’t want to be here”) or talk that inhibits change (“I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem?”). Often the simplest and most effective way of building rapport and loosening the grasp of resistance is to simply reflect the patient’s message in your own words. Often, patients are primed for persuasion and direction. Reflection statements can contribute to feelings of validation and interpersonal trust.

Resistance as an interpersonal process / Resistance as developmentally appropriate

It is important to keep in mind that resistance is both developmentally appropriate for adolescent patients and an interpersonal process that occurs within the therapeutic alliance. Although, we may expect a certain degree of resistance on a developmental level, we can provide corrective experiences around resistance that still promote autonomy. A clinician may benefit from awareness about the resistance that is brewing in a session, abstain from engaging in a power struggle, and promote an alliance with the patients’s desire for autonomy.

Highlight intrinsic control

An effective technique that facilitates a shift from resistance talk to change talk is the clinician’s emphasis on the patient’s access to her personal control. A clinician may reflect the pros and cons experienced by the patient:

Patient: “I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem? Gosh! That was so hard!”

Therapist: “It sounds like you did well in school this year, but ED made it more difficult.”

A clinician may also reflect a patient’s choice within the constraints of the treatment environment while having the knowledge of the consequences. For example, the patient may be informed of her choice to select what day an exposure is initiated or asked to reflect on her choice to not participate in a group while being aware of consequence of losing a daily privilege as a result.

Shifting focus  

If resistant talk persists, the clinician can shift the focus to another closely relevant therapeutic topic that may tie into the overall theme beneath the resistance. For example, if the patient states, “I don’t want to take medications and that’s final!” the clinician can say, “Ok, how about you tell me how you’re feeling about your overall health today?”

Working with patients experiencing resistance and treatment ambivalence can be challenging. However, there are great opportunities at this treatment phase that can strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the ground work necessary for lasting change. Motivational interviewing and person-centered techniques are an integral component of the clinical work at Clementine adolescent treatment program.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Southern California Clementine Opening

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Monte Nido has been strongly rooted in the eating disorder treatment field with over twenty years of providing treatment in California. We consistently refine program components that are integral to our clients’ ability to become fully recovered, and listen to what professionals tell us there is a need for.

With that in mind, we are delighted to announce that Monte Nido & Affiliates residential treatment program, Clementine, will be opening in the Malibu area in early 2018 for adolescent girls. Created to be sensitive to the developmental needs of this younger population, Clementine tailors medical, psychiatric, clinical and nutritional care in the comfort of a home with the highest level of medical and psychiatric care outside of a hospital. Our adolescent-centric team provides decades of experience in a collaborative environment rarely offered to teens and their families.

All of the Monte Nido & Affiliates programs are connected through our shared histories, vast overlap in mission, treating all clients as people first, dedication to evidence-based eating disorder treatment and our belief that being fully recovered is possible. The Monte Nido and Clementine programs will deliver treatment to adults and adolescents in California, while maintaining their own unique approaches and age- appropriate program components. We hope you will make time to be personally introduced to our Clementine program, meet the team and receive education from the experts who guide our programs through attending any of our upcoming events.

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Staying Power: How to Tolerate What Feels Intolerable

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Jennifer Kreatsoulas, PhD, RYT is a yoga teacher and yoga therapist specializing in eating disorders and body image. In recovery herself, Jennifer is extremely passionate about helping others reconnect with their bodies and be empowered in their lives. Jennifer works with clients in person and via Skype. She also teaches yoga at the Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Philadelphia, is a partner with the Yoga and Body Image Coalition, and leads trauma-sensitive yoga classes. In this week’s post, Jennifer discusses the idea of “staying power” in tolerating what feels intolerable.

While on my healing path from anorexia I’ve had to learn how to tolerate what often felt positively intolerable (my body, food, treatment, calorie increases, exercise restriction, gaining weight, drinking supplements, painful therapy sessions, and much more). I was taught to sit with uneasy feelings and physical discomfort and to wait for them to pass. The reality is that that space and time of “waiting” can be in itself intolerable and set off habitual negative thoughts and behaviors. Yes, learning to be present to discomfort is an important life skill, and that awareness is key, however, I believe that approach can sometimes feel passive and leave us feeling helpless in a difficult moment or situation.

Staying power is what I call super-charged presence. It’s actively and directly taking on intolerable feelings — those feelings that set off negative thoughts and coping behaviors. It’s about staring those painful thoughts down and not letting yourself off the hook with sabotaging and destructive behaviors — like hiding food, over exercising, being dishonest with support people, or checking out by starving, purging, and bingeing. The more we practice staying power and get comfortable with what feels intolerable, then the door to acceptance and the deeper work of healing can open. But first, we have to learn how to NOT escape the feeling.

The minute you have the awareness that you want to dodge, push away, or ignore a feeling or situation is the exact time to tap into your staying power. In yoga, we have a saying: the pose begins the moment you want to come out of it. The same with recovery: the real work begins when we choose to stay and push ourselves to withstand what feels awful. In my experience, practices like mantra, deep breathing, and yoga poses cultivate staying power by creating focused positivity. For others, prayer, art, music, cooking, and nature brings a peace and calm from which to harness clarity and strength.

To learn your power source, reflect on these questions:

  • When in your life do you feel empowered?
  • What activity are you doing?
  • What thoughts, feelings, and emotions do you sense when you feel empowered?
  • How do you hold your body in that moment?

The qualities and activities you identified are your power source. To “stay” with what feels intolerable, you need to plug into your personal power source. It will both protect you from self-sabotaging behaviors and empower you to call on your strengths and not be defeated by what you believe you can’t tolerate.

I get that it’s not easy to REMEMBER your strengths when you feel consumed by an intolerable feeling and you want it to go away ASAP. Most likely, you have habitual responses that will need rewiring. To help you remember your strengths, I encourage you to create an intention that aligns with your power source or carry a grounding stone to help pull yourself out of ED Head and into the moment. You might even ask yourself “WTF” (What’s the Feeling?) when the urge to check out comes on or try this simple yoga practice to interrupt habitual eating disorder rituals.

Here’s the thing: we need to get creative and test out little tricks to begin to make small shifts in our recovery. We can’t cultivate staying power if we don’t actively, directly, and deliberately pull ourselves out of ED Head and use our personal power to rise above the challenge of tolerating what feels intolerable.

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


“You Better Check Yourself: How to Handle Challenging Situations in the Treatment of Eating Disorders”

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Please join Clementine adolescent treatment programs for “You Better Check Yourself: How to Handle Challenging Situations in the Treatment of Eating Disorders” presented by Clementine Medical Director Lauren Ozbolt, MD. 

Parenting an adolescent is really hard work and parenting one navigating an eating disorder greatly intensifies the situation. How do you enforce boundaries and limits when your teenager is underweight and at risk? How do you encourage them to follow rules or a meal plan when they are at a stage of development where they are “supposed to” rebel and not follow the rules? By gaining understanding about the pathology of eating disorders and the normal separation-individuation process of adolescents, we can employ strategies to partner with the adolescent as opposed to fighting this natural process. This presentation will focus on these strategies and tools used in the treatment of adolescent eating disorders.

In this presentation, participants will learn to name three factors that make treating adolescent eating disorders especially challenging, state the developmental tasks of the adolescent and state the rationale for the use of psychotropic medications in eating disorders.

The presentation will take place at Wine Cask in Santa Barbara, CA on Thursday, September 14th. Check-in will begin at 11:30am and the lunch and presentation will be from 12:00-1:30pm. Please RSVP to Regional Outreach Manager Mary Andreasen (mandreasen@montenidoaffiliates.com) to join.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn about summer programming at Clementine, please visit our website or reach out to an Admissions Specialist.


A Fine Line: The Intersection of Mental Health and the Medical Treatment of Eating Disorders

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Clementine’s Chief Medical Officer Joel Jahraus, MD, FAED, CEDS and Medical Director Lauren Ozbolt, MD, CEDS oversee the psychiatric care and attending psychiatrists at all Clementine adolescent treatment program locations. In their writing, they share the many challenges with eating disorder treatment and the broader implications for adolescents and young adults. They stress how accurate diagnosis and treatment necessitate the interaction of a multidisciplinary team including mental health, medical and nutrition.  

I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it the right way, didn’t become more complicated.” –Paul Anderson

To say eating disorders are multi-faceted illnesses would be a serious understatement, as any professional in the field would tell you. Not only do treatment teams have to find a balance between their different disciplines when addressing complicated medical and psychiatric issues, but they also face the added challenges of working with patients who are often unhappy about being in treatment, tend to have difficulty trusting treatment providers, may feel in denial of their condition or resistant to treatment, and on top of everything else may face legal or financial barriers to seeking proper treatment. All of these obstacles don’t even begin to cover the myriad of psychiatric and medical comorbidities that typically present in a patient with an eating disorder.

When unraveling an eating disorder medically, we are first encountered with the challenge of discerning whether or not symptoms such as dizziness, tremors, and heart palpitations are the result of malnutrition, dehydration, altered metabolism or from psychiatric manifestations such as anxiety.  Additionally, we also come across co-morbid medical conditions such as hypothyroidism, anemia, and atypical chest pain (just to name a few) that can in turn cause psychiatric symptoms. When psychotropic medications are introduced into the equation, it is important for the team to be vigilant as they themselves can have side effects that can manifest as medical or psychiatric complications. This constant presentation of symptoms that compete for both medical and psychiatric care calls for effective and cohesive clinical integration when treating clients with eating disorders. The underlying illness, whether psychiatric or medical may be challenging to diagnose and one should not immediately rule out the other when complications arise. People with mental health issues often get physically ill; they are not mutually exclusive.

It is clear that there are a multitude of considerations to make when first meeting a client and as promised, the problem is only more complicated when we hone in on any one aspect of the illness. When it comes to evaluation and treatment planning, once again, clinical integration is key. There are several general considerations that we recommend taking into account when first meeting a patient:

Be suspicious: patients may make evaluation more difficult, either by being unwilling to give a full history, unable to give an accurate description of symptoms or too frightened to allow a full physical exam.

Remember that patients with mental illness develop medical problems too.

Be alert for presentations, which make medical illness more likely, but don’t stop considering a medical illness just because they don’t initially fit.

Look for symptoms that make medical illness more likely.

Do not assume a certain symptom “must” be of psychological origin.

Be holistic: note the patient’s feelings and functioning within the current context as well as what happened in the past.

Above all, it is important to be aware of the limitations placed on a patient’s capacity for recovery when looking at a complex illness through a narrow lens. It is crucial that clinicians are acutely aware of the urgency of the patient’s needs, whether medical or psychiatric, and appropriately empathize with the individual to reassure them that you understand their concerns. They need to know that you will you will work to help them feel better whatever the cause.  Integration of the various disciplines involved in the care and treatment of eating disorders takes collaboration. With balance, careful consideration of contributing factors and regular communication, eating disorder providers can successfully help treat their patients in a holistic and effective way.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn about summer programming at Clementine, please visit our website or reach out to an Admissions Specialist.


Our Clementine Family: Dr. Melissa Spann

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In this week’s Our Clementine Family, Vice President of Admissions Dr. Melissa Orshan Spann, PhD, LMHC, CEDS shares her journey to joining the Monte Nido & Affiliates team. She gives insight into the work she does with the admissions team and what inspires her to be so dedicated and passionate in her role. Read on to learn more about Dr. Spann…

What is your name and what are your credentials?
Melissa Orshan Spann, PhD, LMHC, CEDS

Please give us a brief description of your background.
When I decided to go to graduate school in a helping profession it was no shock to my friends and family. Growing up as the oldest of four kids, involved in community service and social action organizations, it was a natural path for me. During my doctoral training, I was introduced to a program called Rosh Hodesh: It’s a Girl Thing!, a proactive approach for building healthy self-esteem in adolescent girls. Through my work facilitating girl-only groups, I reaffirmed my dedication to working with girls and women. I decided an essential part of my training would need to include integrating a systemic perspective and holistic approach to my work. Through this, I moved to Philadelphia and attended a Ph.D. program in Couples and Family Therapy. While I was in Philadelphia, I was introduced to The Renfrew Center in Philadelphia. There, I began my training in the field of eating disorders. I developed a specialization for working with couples and families who were struggling to cope with an eating disorder in their families. When I returned to home to Miami, I was introduced to Oliver-Pyatt Centers. From the moment I walked into the building, I knew OPC was the type of environment I had always hoped could exist; a place where women and their families could be provided a multi-systemic integrated approach to health and healing. Following my time as a Primary Therapist at OPC I became the Director of Admissions. After two years as Director of Admissions where we sought to build a clinical focus for a best-in-class admissions department, my role evolved to the VP of Admissions for Monte Nido & Affiliates. It was a dream for me to work in the broader role for all MNA brands including Monte NidoOPCand Clementine.

What does a typical day look like for you?
What I love about my job is that there isn’t really a “typical” day. In my current role, I have the unique opportunity to interface with many people on a daily basis. I am talking with potential clients, meeting families, working with providers and interfacing with all of our outstanding teams across the country. I feel fortunate that I often have the opportunity to connect with an individual as their first point of contact for one of our programs. Placing that initial call is often the most difficult decision to make. Myself and the highly specialized and trained admissions staff understand how critical this initial contact is and seek to meet every individual who connects us with the connection, empathy and support they receive in our care. Our goal is to provide support, consultation through a therapeutic lens during every interaction we have.

In your own words, please describe the philosophy of Monte Nido & Affiliates.
To me, our philosophy is about balancing acceptance and change, integrating mindfulness in all aspects of life, and focusing on a highly interpersonal model that through connection and meaningful relationships, recovery is possible.

What is your favorite thing about Monte Nido & Affiliates?
I have held many roles throughout the organization. No matter what I am doing, by far the best part of my job is the amazing group of people that I work with. Everyone shares a common vision and goal, respect one another, and share a life both professionally and personally with each other. Through our outstanding staff, we are able to model what it means to share in strong female relationships that provide support and care – something that is translated to the women we work with.

What are three facts about you that people do not know?
Oh boy, here it goes: 1- I have played the guitar since I was five and love to rock out. 2- I have two kids, Violet age six and Archer age eight who teach me more on a daily basis than any book I’ve ever read. 3- I am a third generation Miami native.

Is there any additional information you want to share with our readers?
I’m always ready to talk – call me and we’ll figure it out together!

How can someone contact you and your team?

Monte Nido Admissions Line: 888.228.1253

Clementine Admissions Line: 855.900.2221

Oliver-Pyatt Centers Admissions Line: 866.511.4325

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manorplease reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Finding Your Passion with Career Testing

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Associate Director of Clinical Research and Clinical Outcomes Dr. Jessica Genet, PhD explores the importance of finding a passion; whether that includes hobbies, extracurricular activities, a major in college, or a career path. Career assessments and further exploration in therapy allow clients to understand their preferences, values and interests, and offers guidance toward following a true passion. 

“Individuals working to break free from the tangle of eating disorders need to find their passions in life… By passions I mean something external that gives the individual enjoyment, positive structure, or a pathway to self-knowledge.”
– Ira M Sacker, M.D., Author of “Regaining Your Self”

We strive to help our patients explore their passions and live a more meaningful life. Unfortunately, the eating disorder is often so preoccupying and all-consuming that it interferes with the process of exploring interests and engaging in fun activities. Some of our clients struggle to find a job, a major in college, hobbies or extracurricular activities that bring them true enjoyment. Other clients have chosen paths and activities that “look good” externally (and bring them praise from family and friends) but are internally unrewarding. With these struggles in mind, all aspects of our treatment at Clementine, from therapy sessions and yoga classes to outings in the community, aim to help our patients find their passions, explore new activities, and find what brings them true happiness.

One particularly unique service we offer at Clementine is the opportunity to complete a career assessment. Career assessments are designed to help individuals understand their preferences, values and interests, and offers guidance towards selecting majors in school, jobs, career paths, and hobbies that are motivating and rewarding. Are you a person who tends to make decisions based on personal values or are you someone who tends to make decisions based on logic? Are you a person who prefers working on teams or prefers accomplishing tasks independently? Are you excited about activities that require self-expression and creativity? Are you interested in the helping professions such as teaching? These are just some of the questions a career assessment will explore. It is important to understand that a career assessment is not a magic eight ball and will not spit out an answer like “you must become a teacher.” Instead, it offers a springboard for discussion on these topics, leaving plenty of space for personal reflection and choice. Career assessments offer more than guidance on career or job choices; many of our clients describe the experience as an opportunity for self-discovery. We are delighted to provide this service to our clients.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manor, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Our Clementine Family: Megan Fahey, MS, RD, CDN

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Clementine Briarcliff Manor Registered Dietitian Megan Fahey, MS, RD, CDN shares her personal journey to joining the Briarcliff Manor team in this week’s “Our Clementine Family”. Megan gives an inside look at her daily work in supporting adolescents on their path to full recovery. Read on to learn more about Megan and the Briarcliff Manor team.

What is your name and what are your credentials?

My name is Megan Fahey, MS, RD, CDN. I am a Registered Dietitian with a Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics from Bastyr University.

Please give us a brief description of your background.

I have always been intrigued by the mind-body connection, and am passionate about applying my knowledge of nutrition to promote physical, mental, and emotional healing. Through previous work in acute care and private practice settings, I have gained experience developing and implementing detailed nutrition care plans for adolescents and their families.

What does a typical day look like for you at Clementine?

My days consist of organizing menus in the kitchen, reviewing medical information in the office, and holding individual and group nutrition therapy sessions with our clients. I run weekly lunch outings to local restaurants, as well as weekly cooking groups to provide a variety of food exposures. As the adolescents progress through treatment, I also teach them the skills necessary to portion food in accordance with their meal plans. I keep in constant communication with the adolescents’ outpatient teams and families in order to collaborate on nutrition-related care and create a smooth discharge home. My daily goal is to help each adolescent feel energized and empowered by learning how to nourish her body in a mindful way.

In your own words, please describe the philosophy of Clementine.

At Clementine the goal is to provide adolescents with the tools required to let go of an eating disorder and re-engage in a healthy, well-nourished life. We reject the diet mentality, embracing that all food is fuel and that healthy bodies come in all shapes and sizes. Through an improvement in nutritional status and exploration of deep emotional work, we truly believe everyone can experience the freedom of full recovery from an eating disorder.

How does your team work together? How do your roles overlap and differ?

The clinical team at Clementine shares office space, which fosters an environment of collaboration and professional support. We hold weekly team meetings to discuss every component of the client’s care. Although each practitioner offers a unique skill set, we are constantly learning from one another in order to enhance our treatment approach as a team. I work closely with the chef, clinicians, and recovery coaches to create a supportive eating environment to help ease the anxiety that arises around meal times. I value our model of open and honest communication and admire the strength and empathy shown by each and every team member.

What is your favorite thing about Clementine?

I am humbled to work in a role that allows me to witness the powerful, healing journey of eating disorder recovery. The adolescents who enter our home are some of the most insightful, kind, and intelligent individuals whom I have ever met. In working specifically with adolescents, I am reminded to view the world through a lens of curiosity and possibility.  As an added bonus, the adolescents keep me up-to-date on the latest social and pop culture trends!

What are three facts about you that people do not know?

  1. My paternal family lives on a farm in Ireland. I spend time every year on their beautiful land and have always believed that those “roots” influenced my desire to pursue a degree in nutrition.
  2. I love to read and write and have kept journals regularly since the age of 8. The tattered, worn stack of journals sits at my nightstand and I almost never travel without something to write in.
  3. My absolute favorite movie is “The Little Mermaid” and as a child I dreamt of being able to live and breathe underwater.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manor, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.