If She Were Your Daughter, What Would You Do?


LaurenOzboltClementineBlogClementine Medical Director Lauren Ozbolt, MD is board certified in adolescent, adult and child psychiatry. She oversees the psychiatric care and attending psychiatrists at all Clementine locations. In her post, Dr. Ozbolt shares some the work being done at Clementine and the commitment the staff has to each adolescent’s recovery.

I can recall first wanting to become a physician when my mother would take me to the pediatrician’s office when I was feeling sick as a child. Often times my doctor would sit next to me and calmly explain what he felt was going on and all the options for treatment that were available. My mother would always reply in the same way whether I had the flu or needed hospitalization. She would say, “If she were your daughter…what would you do?” To this day, that is how I think about the adolescents we treat, and that is the approach that permeates the air at Clementine. With each adolescent we think, “If this was my daughter, what would I do…”

Here’s what we would do…

At Clementine, your daughter’s psychiatrist takes the time to get to know the girl underneath the eating disorder. We empower and equip her with the tools – whether they be therapy, medication or both – to help her overcome her eating disorder. We feel the best kind of care is collaborative care and we invest a great deal of time in making parents “experts” on the most innovative treatments, neurobiological causes and the latest research in the field of eating disorders. We feel in order to treat a disease it is important for you and your daughter to fully understand the illness and our rationale for treatment. At the heart of Clementine program is a commitment to your daughter.

 While education about treatment of eating disorders is invaluable, it is only a part in what makes out treatment unique. We truly delight in knowing her and your family and take pride in aligning ourselves with you. At Clementine, your daughter’s future goals, become our goals and hence starts a beautiful restorative process of getting her back on track to become the amazing young woman she is destined to become.


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Talking to Kids about Body Image with Dr. Zanita Zody


Clementine Portlandzanita Clinical Director Zanita Zody, PhD, LMFT guides her team with warmth and compassion as they provide comprehensive care to the adolescents who entrust their treatment in them. Recently, Dr. Zody sat down with Portland Today to share some of her expertise in supporting adolescents with body image issues. Watch Dr. Zody’s appearance on Portland Today here: 


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Our Clementine Family: Megan Hamann


megan-hamann-20171Clementine Academic Liaison Megan Hamann has been working in the education field for over ten years. In her role, Megan ensures that the adolescents are able to stay on track with their school work while on their journey to full recovery. Learn more about Megan and her work at Clementine in this week’s “Our Clementine Family”…

What is your name and what are your credentials?

My name is Megan Hamann. I hold a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education from Asbury University in Wilmore, Kentucky and I also have my Master’s degree in Special Education from Florida Gulf Coast University, in Fort Myers, Florida. I am looking forward to beginning my Specialist degree in Education leadership in the Fall here in Miami.

Please give us a brief description of your background.

Surprisingly, teaching was something I never thought I would do! School definitely was not my favorite thing growing up. However, after a decade of being an educator, I wouldn’t have it any other way! I decided to pursue education, to make it a fun and enjoyable experience for my students.

I have had the privilege to teach in amazing schools, focusing on grades 1st – 6th. I hold certifications in ESOL, Elementary K-6, English 6-12, and Special Education. Having taught in Georgia, Naples, Florida, and Miami, I have had a wide experience in different public school systems, as well as Charter Schools. However, one of the best experiences was teaching at Ada Merritt in Miami – one of the top International Bachelorette schools in the country! I love all the experiences I have had, especially the wonderful students & administrators I have worked with, which has thoroughly helped in the position I hold today!

I began working for Oliver Pyatt Center in 2015 after I was looking to step back from the public school system to spend more time with my children. I started OPC as the English teacher and after a few months of working with the clients, I was asked to fulfill the role as the Educational Liaison. I love to work with the adolescents, parents, school counselors and principals on a daily basis to ensure the adolescents are able to stay on track with their education while they focus on their recovery.

What does a typical day look like for you at Clementine?

Typically, my day begins by checking my email to make sure I can connect the adolescents with the teachers or counselors who have emailed assignments or tasks. On the days I am in the classroom with the adolescents, I check in with them to see how their work load is. We aim to maintain a healthy balance of school work with their treatment. If adolescents are overwhelmed, we cut back, if they can handle more work, we add more. When adolescents first admit, we create a personal plan for each. We look at their work load, course requirement for graduation and the reality of what can be attained during our school hours at Clementine to find the best fit for each adolescent in treatment.

In your own words, please describe the philosophy of Clementine.

Education, as well as recovery, is something that effects the adolescents for the rest of their lives. While their recovery and focus on treatment is the number 1 priority, education is also an important part of their lives as well. Our goal is to maintain the appropriate balance to keep the adolescents on track for graduation, while they focus on recovery. However, this is different for each adolescent that comes in, which is why communication is a key factor in the success.

How does your team work together? How do your roles overlap and differ?

Teamwork is key at Clementine! Education is just a piece of the puzzle that we all bring to the table. Without that piece, there would be a big hole in the picture! As our team brings together information, it is amazing to see how certain parts of the Eating Disorder can affect school, learning capabilities and also social aspects as well. As an educator, I aim to bring my knowledge together with the doctors and therapists to help understand why the school situation is impacting the clients positively or negatively.

What is your favorite thing about Clementine?

My favorite aspect of Clementine has been working with schools and adolescents all over the country! I have learned a lot about the school systems and medical leaves, school & state requirements, and have met so many wonderful people who are also focused on wanting the best for our adolescents. Guidance Counselors and principals play a key role in helping the girls attain success as well, it has been such a joy to work with such caring people!

What are three facts about you that people do not know?

When I was in college, I was a nanny for a family who had four kids under the age of three in SoHo, NYC! That was an experience! I also backpacked Europe after I graduated college with only a couple hundred dollars! My biggest secret is – When I was in college I had a major intestinal surgery that took a year to fully recover from, I know that is odd to share here, but I have seen that it has helped me connect with the girls in a very intimate way. I had to take a semester off my college classes and felt it was the end of the world, however, to get better and recover was actually what I needed. I was able to continue to finish school, I finished just a little later than I first anticipated. However, that ended up being the best thing for me. I love to share this with the clients, so they know I completely understand how hard it is to stop their ‘plan’ for school and focus on the quality & health of their own life. I understand it is hard, but we will work together to get them to a place where they can be successful!


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Q&A: A parent’s view on the treatment of and recovery from an eating disorder



We had the great honor to speak with a mother who shared her own first-hand experience of an eating disorder within her family. She works tirelessly to promote eating disorder knowledge, awareness, and recovery through her own advocacy work. This week’s blog post gives insight into a her personal view of treatment, recovery, and the experience of eating disorders within the family unit.

What behaviors should families be aware of within the home and at meals? What are the warning signs your loved one has an eating disorder?

CM: The big thing is a change in behavior and eating habits. It [eating disorders] can change its face for different people so look for any type of drastic change in behavior or eating habits. Be aware of an an overall increased focus on food that was not present before; an obsession with cooking and baking, but no participation in eating the item, watching cooking shows, completing research on recipes and creating elaborate meals, but not actually eating the meals themselves, etc. Some loved ones may begin eating in a ritualistic manner or finding excuses not to eat food. Some loved ones may begin eliminating food groups, begin dieting, or become a vegetarian or vegan for no particular reason. A health focus can lead to restriction of different food groups, quality or quantity of food groups, that leads to more and more restriction; and excessive water loading before or during meals.

Look not only for changes in eating behaviors, but also changes in overall behaviors and social behaviors; for example, loved ones may start withdrawing from friends and family, won’t eat in public, don’t want to attend events that will involve food, and will eventually not want to attend public events at all.

Additional warning signs may include constant body comparison and body image issues, obsession with weight, size, shape, constant weighing, and isolation, excessive and ritualistic exercise, rigid beliefs and actions around food, exercise, body image, and behaviors, decompensation of mental functioning, dramatic and quick mood swings, inability to retain information, emotional unbalance, or physical symptoms such as lanugo, extremities turning blue, etc.

Keep in mind that significant weight loss may not occur for all individuals struggling with disordered eating; while weight may remain constant, focus on changes in the behaviors of your loved ones.

What was helpful in getting your loved one to commit to treatment?

CM: Parents have to call it as they see it and have to be an ally for their loved one. Many times parents are in denial that something is wrong. You have to send a clear and steady message that your loved one is decompensating while providing specific examples, work together with your loved ones’ outpatient team, and express your support with a statement such as, “I am not going to stand by while these things are happening.” Parents need to address the situation calmly and rationally, explain the behaviors you are witnessing and why you feel he or she needs to attend treatment.

Be aware that as a parent, you have a different view of your loved one than her outpatient team. There are times the loved one may be able to put on a “healthy face” for the outpatient team or while at home and act as if they are doing well. At times, it may require the parents of the loved one to care for the individual and spearhead the path to treatment.

How does a parent know their loved one needs to go to treatment?

CM: When things aren’t getting better, even in outpatient treatment. When your loved ones’ entire life is falling apart. When you are in a living hell at home. When there is decompensation in all areas. Everything is screaming that your loved one needs residential or inpatient treatment and it is obvious she needs much more support. Remember it [the eating disorder] is not just a phase and it will not go away without proper treatment.

Parents may become very frustrated with their loved one. Their loved one may say they do not need help or support. Parents have to remember that eating disorders are not a choice and that their child is not an eating disorder. It is important to remain your child’s ally and to avoid becoming confrontational. Do not get on the roller coaster with the child. Be supportive, but also separate the disorder from your child – externalize the illness.

There are times when your loved one is not in the position to say yes to treatment and you will have to eliminate all other options. You have to say, “You need help, this is serious. You have two options: going to treatment or going to the hospital.” Parents cannot negotiate with treatment, but should include the child in the decision (i.e. provide specific examples of the behaviors and decompensation witnessed and why you feel your loved one should enter treatment). Paint the picture very calmly, express love and concern for your loved one’s wellbeing, and then provide one combined option of treatment and support. Do not let it become a battle because then you are also battling with the eating disorder.

What was successful in treatment (i.e. family therapy, phone calls from clinical team, family Friday)?

CM: Therapy with the entire family is critical. Do not forget about the siblings and how they are affected during this process.

The more learning curves in the road during treatment the better (i.e. someone saying something triggering at a dinner outing, etc.) Your loved one will learn to handle experiences that are going wrong instead of everything being perfect. You want treatment to go smoothly, but you want your loved one to be able to navigate difficulties whether they be social, food, etc.

What advice would you give parents whose loved one is in treatment?

CM: School often takes priority over all else. You need to firmly establish that health is the number one priority and that school and anything else comes second to health. You cannot negotiate because of these other “important” life events. If you do, you are sending the message this is not a top priority and that getting help for your eating disorder is not urgent. Children need to understand this is urgent, this is serious, and that nothing else is more important.

Do not negotiate with the eating disorder. The minute you start negotiating with the eating disorder all bets are off.

Be clear, be firm, and do not negotiate on any level (i.e. becoming vegan, staying at school to finish up before treatment, coming back to school for trip or play, etc.) Do not engage in these conversations – the eating disorder will see the crack in the window and will keep picking at it.

What support do parents need or do you suggest they get while their child is in treatment?

CM: If you have questions or concerns while your loved one is in treatment, speak directly to the treatment team. Do not cast doubt on the treatment team or the treatment; your loved one could take this as an opportunity to disengage, she may begin feeling she is not sick enough to require treatment, or the eating disorder may find a way to sneak back in.

Make sure you are also taking care of yourself. You may be physically and mentally exhausted so make sure you are receiving support; whether that is through self-help books, psychotherapy, education, and understanding what it will look like when your loved one leaves treatment. Know the path to recovery will not be a straight shot and there are going to be bumps in the road.

Siblings, couples, and individual therapy are all helpful. The eating disorder can infiltrate and effect the entire family. Join an advocacy group (listed below) to find support and affect change. Find support in any way you can so you do not become isolated. Find individuals and community support from people who understand where you are coming from.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Fat Chat is No Light Matter



Andrea Wachter is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and author of Getting Over Overeating for Teens. She is also co-author of The Don’t Diet, Live-It Workbook and Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Breaking the “I Feel Fat” Spell. She is an inspirational counselor, author and speaker who uses professional expertise, humor and personal recovery to help others. In her writing, Andrea shares strategies to help parents foster a positive relationship between their children and their bodies.

As an eating disorders therapist and woman who spent the majority of my life in the grip of a weight and food obsession, I walk around with my antennae tuned in to whatever might help me understand how we got ourselves into this mess. Obesity is now considered an epidemic. My young bulimic clients tell me, “Vomiting is no big deal.” Every day, people die from anorexia-related complications. And let’s face it, folks: Even many Americans of average weight are preoccupied with food and body image.

Recently in a grocery store check-out line, I stood behind a thirty-something mom and her little girl. The mother was chatting on her cell phone while the daughter was clinging to her mom’s leg with one hand and sucking on the thumb of the other.

The mother’s side of the conversation went like this: “Oh, I was so bad yesterday! I had a whole piece of chocolate cake at the party. I am not eating any carbs today. I feel as big as a house.”

I wanted to hand the daughter my business card right then and there! I refrained, though, since the kid, still in diapers, was a little too young for therapy.

My point is that your children are listening. They are listening when you partake in what I call “fat chat.” They are listening when you say you feel “fat” (which, by the way, is not a feeling). They are listening when you say you were “bad” or “good” or “evil” or “sinned” because of a food you either ate or passed up. They are listening when you say you need to go to the gym to work off your dessert. They are listening when you comment on other people’s bodies or your own. Your children are listening and learning and following suit. And what they often end up thinking is: “I better watch out. I might get fat. Maybe I am fat. If I am, then people are judging me. I better control my eating. Uh-oh, I can’t stop eating. Hunger is bad. Fullness is worse.”

Every year, my clients get younger. I have seen six-year-olds who are already dieting and know about carbs, fats and calories. I worked with a seven-year-old girl who was spitting up her food because she was convinced that calories were bad for her. Last year, I had a nine-year-old client who had to change her school clothes several times each morning till she found something she didn’t feel “fat” in. Most often, though, people don’t get to my door until they have been entrenched in food and weight struggles for many years. While an eating disorder is possible to overcome, the longer it goes on, the harder it is to heal. We need to do prevention at the ground level. We have a choice: We can teach our children to relax, listen to their bodies and love themselves, or we can teach them to be anxious, controlling, and out of touch with their own hunger and fullness.

My message here is not to blame or to shame, but merely to highlight the fact that unless we model a healthy, balanced, and loving relationship with food and our own bodies, children are at risk for developing disordered eating, poor body image, and/or weight problems. Take a look at the messages you are teaching. Learn to enjoy food again. Stay conscious of your body’s hunger and fullness levels and act on them. Get help if you can’t. Treat your body with respect and appreciation. After all, isn’t this what we want our kids to do?

Tips for Helping Your Child with Body Image

• If you find yourself “feeling fat,” explore a little deeper to see if there’s something else going on in your life. Model for your children that “fat” is not a feeling, but rather “feeling fat” can be a distraction from more difficult issues.

• Try not to label food as “good” or “bad.” Some foods are more nutrient dense than others, but morally all food is equal — it’s fuel! Talk with your kids about the nutritional value and variety of different foods, the art of cooking, and the fun and the pleasure of eating.

• Talk to your kids about the difference between emotional and physical hunger and how the two often get mixed up. Physical hunger is a feeling in the belly that the body needs fuel. Teach kids to notice degrees of hunger and fullness as well as how to eat when they are hungry and stop when they are full. Emotional hunger is usually a need to express feelings or have feelings acknowledged. When kids are sad, they might need to cry, talk about it, or draw a picture. When they are mad, they might want to write, draw, punch a pillow, tell you about it with gusto, and have you really hear them.

• Along these same lines, talk about the role of feelings: that they are signposts for living, and not to be “stuffed” or “starved” away. Teach them that just like there are no “good” or “bad” foods, there are no “good” or bad” feelings.

• Do not comment on other people’s bodies. This sets up a comparison mentality that is harmful and hard to give up. Talk about how everyone is beautiful in their own way, and that beauty is an inner quality that can be expressed in outer characteristics such as kindness and enthusiasm.

• Exercise with your kids for the joy of movement, not for how many calories you might burn.

• Look at family photos and talk about where your size and shape came from.

• Watch TV together and discuss the emphasis our culture places on looks, image, and thinness. Help them to notice special qualities in themselves like compassion and humor as well as things that interest them beyond their appearance. Teach them that they are enough just by being who they are — on the inside. (While you’re at it, think about yourself that way, too!)

• Do de-stressing activities together, like: listening to music, walking, spending time in nature, playing games, doing a hobby or craft, or reading and discussing a particular book.

• Help them to foster love for themselves when they look in the mirror. Teach them to “see” themselves with the same love that they feel for other people or animals in their lives.

• Make a list together of all the things that our bodies do for us. Help them to appreciate their various body parts rather than criticize them.

• Talk about what makes a good role model. Ask for an example of a person who seems to be a healthy, balanced eater with a positive body image. Discuss what qualities that person has that demonstrate good health. Ask your child to imagine having those same qualities inside.

• Teach your child that weight fluctuations are normal and healthy and that we all have a natural weight range just like we have a natural eye and hair color. Help them prepare for weight changes, especially girls approaching puberty.

• Role model and practice all of these things along with your child so they can experience you as a healthy eater with loving body image!


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

5 Keys to Coping with the Holidays



Dr. Stacey Rosenfeld is a licensed psychologist, certified group psychotherapist, certified eating disorder specialist, and the author of Does Every Woman Have an Eating Disorder? Challenging Our Nation’s Fixation with Food and Weight. Her work focuses on substance use disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, fertility challenges, relationship concerns, and sport and exercise psychology. In addition to directing Gatewell Therapy Center in Miami, she is a co-occurring (eating disorders and addictions) consultant at Oliver-Pyatt Centers. Dr. Rosenfeld works with individuals, couples, families, and groups, using cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical-behavioral (DBT), psychodynamic therapy, and motivational interviewing approaches. In this week’s blog post, Dr. Rosenfeld shares strategies to help cope with the upcoming holidays while in eating disorder recovery.

Despite its festivities, the holiday season can present a number of challenges for those in eating disorder recovery. For some, family time can be stressful. Food is often abundant and not on a regular schedule. In many cases, individuals leave the comforts of their homes and routines in order to celebrate with others. Those with co-occurring illness, such as alcohol/substance use disorders, depression, anxiety, or trauma may face additional challenges during this time.

Toward the goal of relapse prevention, a little planning can go a long way. As the holiday season approaches, consider these five “S”s that can help reduce the likelihood of symptoms escalating or re-emerging:


Going into the holidays, take a personal inventory. How have you been doing? What has been challenging for you recently? What have you learned from past events? What types of triggers do you anticipate going into the holidays this year?


Planning is the enemy of relapse. While it might be impossible to predict every potential scenario, strategizing certain situations can go a long way. For instance, if you’re attending a holiday gathering, discuss with one of your treatment professionals how you’ll approach food before, during, and after this event. How will you respond if someone comments on what you’re eating or your weight? If you’re sober, assume someone will offer you a drink; have a response ready to go. Have some topics in mind to discuss if the conversation turns sour (e.g., when the inevitable New Year’s diet talk ensues).


Think about who your supports are and reach out before the holidays approach to see if they’re on board to provide you help if needed. Your interpersonal arsenal might include specific family members, friends, treating professionals, peers from treatment, or others who have identified themselves as healthy supports. Ask your supports if they’ll be available to talk/message at designated times. See if you can check in before and after specific events that you anticipate to be particularly challenging, a practice referred to as “bookending.”


Knowing that the holidays can create additional stress necessitates a ramping up of your standard self-care routine. What can you do that calms you/centers you in preparation for this time? Now is the time to be particularly gentle with yourself. During a stressful situation, are there specific tools you can use to help you through? Do you have an escape strategy ready to go? If something triggers you, and you’re at an event, can you step outside and get some fresh air or contact one of your supports? Are there any pleasurable activities you can get on your calendar following your holiday commitments?


Recognize that, despite your best efforts, setbacks can happen. How you respond to potential setbacks can influence their duration and severity. Recovery is a process of learning from experience, maintaining motivation and commitment, and cultivating self-compassion.


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Article Spotlight


Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

In Groundbreaking Victory for Eating Disorders Prevention & Treatment, Congress Passes Historic Mental Health Reform Legislation NEDA Blog

The Use of Meditation in Children with Mental Health Issues The Psychiatric Times

Transitioning Back to College after Winter Break while in Recovery Eating Disorder Hope

3 Reasons to Let Yourself Feel Your Emotions Psychology Today

Holidays & Hungry Hearts: Serving Soul Food with Jenni Schaefer & Robyn Cruze Angie Viets’ Blog

Wise Words from 10 Women in Recovery About What Empowers Them to Keep Going Chime Yoga Therapy Blog


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Our Clementine Family: Melissa Peterson


melissa-peterson-family-therapist-01Clementine Portland Family Therapist Melissa Peterson, MS, LMFT Intern has been with Monte Nido since 2012. Her warm, open approach to each adolescent helps them to feel comfortable and supported during their time in treatment. Melissa believes strongly that individuals hold capacities for change, and that change can occur through new emotional experiences and authentic emotional expression. Learn more about Melissa and the work she does with the adolescents at Clementine Portland in this week’s “Meet Our Team” post.

What is your name and what are your credentials?

Melissa Peterson MS, LMFT Intern

Please give us a brief description of your background.

I attended the University of Oregon and received both my Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Sociology, as well as my Master of Science in Couples and Family Therapy. While taking undergraduate classes at U of O (go ducks!), I very fortunately began working as a Recovery Coach at Monte Nido Rain Rock Treatment Center, a  residential eating disorder treatment facility in Eugene, OR. I very distinctly remember my interview at Rain Rock because prior to learning about Monte Nido, I had learned that being fully recovered from an eating disorder was not possible. It was not until my interview that I was able to openly talk about being recovered, and that has been so healing for me. Over the past four and a half years, I remained working with Monte Nido in a variety of roles. I moved from Recovery Coach at RainRock, to Therapist Intern. After graduating from graduate school, I moved up to Portland and worked as a Primary Therapist at the Eating Disorder Center of Portland, where I was then promoted to Lead Therapist. Most recently, I moved to Clementine Portland where I work as the Family Therapist and love it!

What does a typical day look like for you at Clementine?

Every day at Clementine looks a bit different for me, depending on what is going on and what is needed that day. Majority of my day is spent hanging out with the adolescents, whether that be eating meals or snacks, facilitating a group, having a family session, or spending time in the milieu. Otherwise, when not with the girls I am in the office talking to the treatment team about most updated clinical information and collaborating on care, as well as calling/communicating with family members.

In your own words, please describe the philosophy of Clementine.

One part of Clementine’s philosophy that I value most is the belief that one can be fully recovered, as opposed to being “in recovery.” As mentioned previously, being recovered is part of my identity, so this philosophy is one I hold very close to my heart. Clementine also believes that a part of being recovered is learning to reach out to people instead of one’s eating disorder. With that being said, one of Clementine’s highest priorities is in building meaningful, loving and supportive relationships with each teen and family member we work with. One way we do this is by meeting each teen where they are at in their stage of recovery, and supporting them throughout this process. Each teen has an individualized treatment plan each week that is specifically created by both the teen and the treatment team. This “contract” is designed to meet the needs of the teen each week, and encompasses a multidisciplinary approach including nutrition, education, family and relationships, thoughts and feelings, etc. Ultimately, this allows all teens to take ownership over their recovery while being supported by the treatment team and their support systems.

How does your team work together? How do your roles overlap and differ?

I absolutely love the team aspect of working at Clementine. When I come into work, I feel like I am spending time with my “extended family,” which I feel so lucky to be a part of. Everyone is so willing to jump in and do whatever is needed to help each other out. Although everyone has a specific “title” that comes with certain responsibilities, it would be hard to tell who wore what hat looking from the outside. Whether that be the dietitian doing observations, therapists cleaning up after lunch, or recovery coaches providing support to girls late at night, we are all willing and able to do whatever is needed to provide the best care and support for the teens and each other.

What is your favorite thing about Clementine?

One of my favorite things about working at Clementine is connecting with all of the teens and their family members. I feel so fortunate to be able to witness the love between each family member or support person, and to see the great lengths each is willing to go for their loved one. Another thing I love most about Clementine has to be how at home I feel here. The environment itself feels so cozy and inviting; the house sits at the end of a very long driveway, amongst a Christmas tree farm, magical white cows (that occasionally appear on the farm next door), and a beautiful landscape. Adding to the “home” feeling of Clementine is the family-essence provided by the staff. As I mentioned previously, I feel so connected to the people I work with and constantly feel their love and support.

What are three facts about you that people do not know?

I am a huge Portland Trail Blazers fan!

I love to cook and try new recipes, as well as explore new restaurants in Portland.

I have two cats named Callaway and Wesley!


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Getting Your Children to Chill Out


Laura Cipullolaura-cipullo is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator, Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian, and four-time author with offices in NYC and NJ. Laura weaves evidence-based science into treating clients, authoring books and speaking engagements. She treats her clients with an approach that combines her knowledge from her credentialed expertise in: nutrition, behavior change, the endocrine system and psychology. In this week’s blog post, Laura shares the importance of helping kids practice mindfulness and the many benefits it can provide.

Kids are stressed out, and really, who can blame them? There’s the pressure to do well in school; to juggle household chores, a social life and extracurricular activities; to fit in with classmates; and to handle all the issues that come with a changing body. Managing that stress is important for feeling good in the moment, and the future: A recent University of Florida study found that kids who experienced three or more stressful occurrences were six times likelier to have physical or mental health issues or a learning disorder than those who did not.

Science backs the benefits of mindfulness when it comes to reducing stress and improving overall health. The University of Massachusetts School’s Mindfulness Program found that mindfulness leads to a 35% reduction in medical symptoms and a 40% reduction in psychological ones. Eating disorders are one example of a psychological issue that can be helped through mindful eating. According to Dr. Susan Albers, “During the past 20 years, studies have found that mindful eating can help you to reduce overeating and binge eating, lose weight and reduce your body mass index (BMI) and cope with chronic eating problems such as anorexia and bulimia, and reduce anxious thoughts about food and your body.”

It doesn’t take long for mindfulness to show a result, either. Carnegie Mellon found that as little as 25 minutes of mindful meditation for three days helped stress. Yoga and meditation specifically help decrease stress hormones, such as cortisol and epinephrine.

With all the research showing the benefits of mindfulness, it’s little wonder that schools are catching on and incorporating the concept on a regular basis. A recent Washington Post article reported on how public schools are teaching the concept of mindful eating. Children are getting in tune with their body’s hunger signals, learning to enjoy the flavors of food, and respect the cues the mind/body are relaying to them; they are also learning to respect what they are putting into their bodies, and to respect their bodies as a whole. This all can help prevent eating disorders in middle-school children, a population at high risk for these issues.

In the wake of the Newton tragedy, Dr. Stuart Ablon of Massachusetts General Hospital was brought to New York schools to conduct seminars for 3,000 school safety agents and police officers. Mindfulness — getting children to acknowledge and resolve their feelings — was a key component of the anti-violence program, as was yoga. The goal was for these agents and officers to talk to troubled children before resorting to punishing them.

Mindfulness and meditation are also becoming a part of private school health classes, as the Wall Street Journal recently reported, and are used to strengthen children’s all-around emotional and intellectual wellness.

Spafinder took note of the Oakland-based Mindful Schools, a program that shows adults how to teach mindfulness to K-12 youth, helping over 300,000 children so far.

Beyond schools, mindfulness and general wellness for kids is taking center stage at hotels, spas and resorts, offering children a way to unwind at the same time their parents are enjoying a well-earned vacation.

And don’t forget to check your local meditation or yoga studio! You may be surprised to find they have children’s classes too (like MNDFL, a New York meditation studio not far from my new office). New York even has its own yoga studio just for kids. I recently filmed a news segment there on the very topic of mindfulness for children.

And while all these mindful-based resources are great for kids, it doesn’t mean kids will forge forward without parental support. I ask parents to take responsibility and please introduce, then maintain, mindful experiences at home. Breathing work, meditation apps, mindful eating (check out my books Healthy Habits and Women’s Health Body Clock Diet for more info) and mindfulness meditation are the most studied and effective strategies in the adult population and therefore a great place to start with the kiddies! Leading by example is also important. Consider how you role model gratitude, body acceptance, compassion and mindfulness in your own life.


For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

Seven Key Developmental Needs Series: Competence and Achievement


Melissa McLain - 03 - TOP CHOICE

In the third post on the seven developmental keys series, Senior Director of East Coast Clinical Programming Melissa McLain Coffin, PhD, CEDS shares about the next two keys: Competence and Achievement. Dr. McLain explains how Clementine adolescent treatment program supports adolescents in shifting their focus from seeing their eating disorder as a source of achievement to other areas of their life that they can feel successful and competent.

The Center for Early Adolescence has defined fundamental developmental needs during adolescence as the following: Self-Definition, Meaningful Participation, Competence, Creative Expression, Physical Activity, Social Interactions and Structure. Today I want to write about the combination of Competence and Achievement and how those can be integrated in the treatment of adolescents with eating disorders.

The need for both competency and achievement are central for successful adolescent development. For many of our teens, the eating disorder has frequently become a source of achievement, if not the main source of achievement, for them in their lives. In order to build a meaningful life in their recovery, it is important for our treatment teams at Clementine to help them discover other ways to achieve and feel competent in their lives.

There are several ways clinicians strive to help teens accomplish this. We know academics are highly important to an adolescent and their development, and we do not want the fact that they are needing treatment – and thus needing to step away from school for a period of time – be an additional stressor.  One way to help instill feelings of competence and achievement is through the integration of five days a week educational instruction in the residential treatment experience.  So, our teens work onsite with both subject area teachers as well as an educational liaison who helps coordinate with their home school. This liaison helps them receive and submit manageable assignments on a weekly basis. Achieving small accomplishments each week in their academic work helps them to meet those competence and achievement needs they have during this time of their lives.

In addition to academic assignments, our teens also work on a variety of therapeutic assignments that are designed to help them enhance the work they are doing in their individual and group therapy. Completing and sharing these assignments allows our adolescents to achieve higher levels in our level system and to feel a sense of accomplishment when they do so. It also allows them to dive deeper in their process of self-understanding and to then bring that work into their therapeutic process.

Our unique multidisciplinary Level System promotes competence and achievement. The level system at Clementine was created to demonstrate clear markers of progress along multidimensional domains of treatment. Each level is structured with certain privileges and ways to challenge the eating disorder through activities, assignments and collaboration. It is designed for adolescents to gradually take increased responsibility with food, thoughts and feelings as they progresses in treatment, giving them opportunities to attain achievement and competence. In addition, since the level system is a self-driven process, our clients are able to move their treatment forward at a pace that feels right to them.

The greatest achievement of all is to eventually achieve a full recovery from their eating disorder, coupled with competence in living in their healthy selves. We strive to help all of our teens work toward that achievement.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.