Learning to Respect Hunger

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Jennifer Kreatsoulas, PhD, RYT, is the founder of Chime Yoga Therapy and specializes in eating disorders and body image. In addition to her private yoga therapy practice, Jennifer leads yoga therapy groups at the Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Philadelphia, is cofounder of the Body Kindness Project, and a partner with both the Yoga and Body Image Coalition and the Transformation Yoga Project. She is the creator of the home video series Yoga to Strengthen Body Image and Support Eating Disorder RecoveryHer writing on the topics of yoga, body image, motherhood, and eating disorder recovery can be found on her blog as well as several influential online publications. Jennifer has been featured in the Huffington Post, Women You Should Know, Medill Reports Chicago, Philly.com, and the DailyDot. Connect with Jennifer: www.ChimeYogaTherapy.com.

“I’ve studied my hunger from every angle. I know its moods, preferences, and quirks. No matter how willfully I rejected or abandoned it, hunger always came back, begging, asking for more. Hunger ate at me, gnawed at my insides, hollowed out my eyes, drained my brain, emptied me out. No amount of shrinking could stifle this maddening hunger of mine.” 

I wrote this passage in a journal years back. Since that dark time, I’ve worked very hard to renegotiate my relationship with hunger by letting go of the conditions I placed upon it. This process has been one of give and take, push and pull. And, if I am completely honest with myself (and you), it’s still a process from time to time. Yet, I’ve had some significant insights along the way that have helped me to be kinder to my hunger, and by extension, my body, mind, and spirit.

Perhaps the most profound insight I had is that hunger is unconditional. The dictionary defines unconditional as “not limited by conditions; absolute.” For example, the common phrase “unconditional love” means affection with no limits or conditions; complete love.

I was trapped in beliefs about hunger that were the exact opposite of unconditional. I was convinced hunger was a punishment. To control my fear of hunger’s punishing demands and pangs, I created countless rules and constructed strict conditions to keep me “in line.” Looking back, the rules and restrictions were maddening, not my hunger.

Learning how to unconditionally trust my hunger is an active and ongoing process (and maybe always will be). I share with you a few of the profoundly significant lessons I’ve learned about respecting my hunger.

1. Hunger can’t tell time. No matter how firmly you believe you must only eat when the clock strikes certain hours, hunger is an organic sensation, not a scheduled meal time. Placing conditions on when the organic sensation of hunger arrives is ultimately impossible and unrealistic and only sets us up for agony and suffering.

2. Hunger has no rules.  For someone like me, who lived by extremely strict rules about food and hunger, it’s powerfully eye opening to trust that hunger has no rules. Hunger just wants to be satiated, attended to, and respected.

3. Hunger isn’t a crisis. More times than I care to admit, hunger has felt like a crisis, inducing panic, uncertainty, and extreme emotional swings. Watching others (especially my daughters) have fun with food has helped me to lighten up at meals and not take my hunger or the food I put in my mouth so seriously.

4. Hunger always returns.  It’s inevitable that fullness fades and hunger returns. Always. No matter how much power we fool ourselves into believing we have over our hunger, it always comes back because it is supposed to. We can numb, but eventually hunger will return unconditionally, and we must deal with feeding ourselves.

5. Hunger is NOT the enemy. This is probably the most profound lesson of all. For many, many years, hunger was my most threatening enemy. It inspired fear, confusion, and self-doubt. My girls have been excellent role models, demonstrating how hunger is simply just hunger, an organic sensation that simply needs to be satiated. When they feel hunger, they ask for food. There’s no debating or arguing with themselves about whether they are actually hungry or not. They don’t try to ignore or pacify their hunger. They don’t curse it, wrestle with it, or endlessly suffer to ignore it. My daughters have taught me that hunger is not out to get me or fatten me. It’s not lurking, waiting to pounce on me. It has no agenda. It’s unconditional. Neutral. Hunger is not the enemy. The eating disorder beliefs, rules, and conditions about hunger were the real enemy.

Coming to terms with our hunger and other aspects of recovery that are frightening and challenging is extremely hard work, as you know; but not impossible. One small insight can lead to a series of shifts that sets us up for new patterns, approaches, and mindsets.

I encourage you to vigilantly and diligently study your hunger or whatever “thing” keeps you feeling stuck. Look at it from every angle and understand the self-imposed rules or conditions that are pinning you down. I can only guess that your insights from this reflection will be profound, as once we come out from underneath the eating disorder rules, we have room to breathe and be, to be renewed in our recovery, and energized to keep pushing forward.

I sign off by wishing you unconditional peace as you continue your journey.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manor, opening on April 24th, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Education and Adolescent Eating Disorder Treatment

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We know consideration of an adolescent’s educational needs is an important component of treatment. At Clementine, a personalized education plan with a multi-disciplinary approach to learning begins upon admission, and we are committed to integrating where each adolescent is at academically, balancing what is in the best interest of her recovery. We believe an important part of residential treatment is preparing them for the real world outside of residential treatment and the back-to-school readiness component is key.

Our goal is to help teens to restore healthy and normal adolescent development. Healthy development is one of the key factors for solidifying a foundation for full recovery from an ED. Supporting our teens’ intellectual, cognitive and educational development is a key component of that process and we view our educational program as an essential part of our treatment program.

Research has shown that teens with eating disorders are particularly vulnerable to the stresses of developmental and academic transitions. We pay particular attention to helping our teens manage these real life transitions and the demands of their academic careers through the development of self-care and stress management skills. To learn more about the educational program at Clementine, visit here.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manor, opening on April 24th, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Our Clementine Family: Amy Sosa

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Clementine South Miami Clinical Director Amy Sosa, PsyD shares her personal journey to joining the Clementine team in this week’s blog post. Read on to learn more about Dr. Amy Sosa and her dedicated team…

1. What is your name and what are your credentials? What is your current role? My name is Dr. Amy Sosa and I am a Licensed Clinical Psychologist. I am the Clinical Director of Clementine Adolescent Treatment Program.

2. Please give us a brief description of your background? Dr. Sosa received her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology where she also received her Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Throughout her career, Dr. Sosa received comprehensive training in play, couples, family, individual, and group therapy. Currently, Dr. Sosa specializes in providing empirically-validated treatment to adolescent girls diagnosed with anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and/or exercise addiction. She has a passion for treating issues impacting girls and women with a focus on enhancing body image. Moreover, she has experience treating complex trauma internationally and completed her dissertation research on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Secondary Traumatic Stress within Rwandese healthcare providers. Additionally, she is certified in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Further, she is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Psychological Association (APA) and Division 52 (International Psychology Division) of the American Psychological Association. Lastly, she is co-chair of the Education Committee for the Miami Chapter of the International Association for Eating Disorder Professionals (IAEDP).

3. What does a typical day look like for you at Clementine? There is no typical day at Clementine and that’s what I love about my job. Throughout the day, Clementine girls engage in school, individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and meal support. Our group therapy program is comprehensive and is rooted in empirically-validated treatment models. For example, we offer a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Group, a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Group, a Body Image Group, and a Family and Relationships Group, among others. We also offer several movement groups in order to facilitate a healthy relationship with oneself and one’s body that is void of compensatory exercise (such as yoga and Thai Chi).

4. In your own words, please describe the philosophy of Clementine. At Clementine, we believe in empowering girls to live a wholehearted life. We provide intensive individual, family, and group therapy in order to improve self-worth and enhance girls’ relationships with themselves/others.  Adolescence is a delicate developmental period where girls are often concerned about appearance and acceptance. At Clementine, we provide girls skills to understand that their identities are multilayered and that their worth is tied to various aspects, including academic, familial, sports, play, and resilience, among others. Oftentimes, our girls are perfectionistic and we strive to give them permission to fail and to learn from their failures. This allows them to develop appropriate coping skills to manage life stressors without engaging in eating disorder or other maladaptive behaviors. We also believe in addressing underlying factors driving eating disorder behaviors in order to fully understand and practice authentic living.

5. How does your team work together? How do your roles overlap and differ? At Clementine, the treatment team is a family which allows us to foster a family setting for our girls. Our team consists of Internal Medicine Physicians, Psychiatrists, Therapists, Nutritionists, Nurses, and Recovery Coaches.  We have lunch together daily and have consultations throughout the week to discuss client care. We also believe in the importance of nurturing relationships outside of work and engage in teambuilding activities deepen relationships with one another.

6. What is your favorite thing about Clementine? My favorite aspect of Clementine is patient care. Our girls are incredibly ambitious, curious, and resilient, and I learn so much from the in-depth work they put forth daily in order to achieve recovery.

7. What are three facts about you that people do not know? I am obsessed with animals: I have one dog, two cats, and I got married on my horse. I love the outdoors: My connection to nature provides me with a sense of groundedness in order to do the work that I do. I spent a year in Swaziland, Southern Africa, which solidified my passion for psychology.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To learn more about our newest location, Clementine Briarcliff Manor, opening on April 24th, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Clementine Briarcliff Manor

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Clementine Briarcliff Manor Clinical Director Danielle Small, MS, LMFT and her team are ready to accept adolescents into their care. Clementine Briarcliff Manor is a unique residential treatment program exclusively for adolescent girls seeking treatment for Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder, or Exercise Addiction. It is the only licensed residential treatment center for adolescents in the state of New York. Read on to learn more from Danielle about Clementine Briarcliff Manor…

As a clinical professional in the field of eating disorders and a veteran Monte Nido team member, I am excited about the arrival of Clementine Briarcliff Manor, our eating disorder program exclusively for adolescent girls, in mid-April.

Adolescence is a time of growth and struggle. It can be both anxiety provoking and exciting navigating new challenges and figuring out one’s place in the world. When grappling with eating disordered thoughts and feelings it complicates this process even more, planting seeds of doubt and fear. At Clementine, we believe you and your loved ones can connect to a place of hope – a place where the eating disorder doesn’t feel necessary to cope.

Within our community there is space to not only speak your truth and face your fears, but experience laughter, friendship and adventure. Part of this adventure is empowering you to connect to a healthy sense of self that will move you toward being fully recovered. It won’t always be easy, but I have faith that when your struggles are explored without judgment and new skills are integrated into your daily life, subtle yet powerful transformations will occur.  These subtle shifts lead to great change and incredible emotional and spiritual growth. This growth is the gift that truly makes this difficult yet amazing journey of recovery so worthwhile.

Located in Westchester County, NY, just north of Manhattan, our new Clementine Briarcliff Manor blends personalized and sophisticated care with the latest research and strategies for adolescents suffering from eating disorders. The highly specialized medical, psychiatric, nutritional and clinical approach, sensitive to the developmental needs of adolescent girls, offers the highest level of care for teens outside of a hospital.

We have assembled an experienced group of professionals who will provide high quality medical, psychological and clinical care for adolescents who are suffering from eating disorders and their families.

Clementine Briarcliff Manor is now accepting adolescents into their care. Please contact an admissions specialist at 855.900.2221 or stayconnected@clementineprograms.com for more information.

For further reading…

http://briarcliff.dailyvoice.com/business/eating-disorder-treatment-center-opening-in-briarcliff/706241

http://www.lohud.com/story/news/local/westchester/ossining/2017/04/03/former-briarcliff-house-treatment-center/99779534/

http://westchester.news12.com/news/treatment-facility-for-teens-with-eating-disorders-to-open-in-briarcliff-manor-1.13356354

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/monte-nido–affiliates-treatment-programs-for-eating-disorders-opens-clementine-residential-program-for-adolescent-girls-in-westchester-county-ny-300434995.html

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


The Sun and Wind Dispute: Navigating Motivation and Readiness for Change in Adolescents with Eating Disorders

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Treating an adolescent who is resistant and treatment ambivalent can be very challenging for a clinician. In this week’s blog post, Clementine Miami Pinecrest Clinical Director Bertha Tavarez, PsyD offers some strategies to help strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the groundwork necessary for full recovery. 

“The sun and the wind were having a dispute as to who was more powerful. They saw a man walking along and they had a bet as to which of them would get him to remove his coat. The wind started first and blew up a huge gale, the coat flapped but the man only fastened the buttons and tightened up his belt. The sun tried next and shone brightly making the man sweat. He took off his coat.” – Anonymous

The metaphor of the sun and the wind is an accurate depiction of the challenges that many clinicians face while working with adolescent patients. Although we may have access to the gravity of our patient’s clinical needs, simply communicating our concerns and providing much needed skills can be met with resistance. Our patients remain “locked in” to their emotional experience while simultaneously feeling “locked out” of the insight and motivation needed to increase their receptivity to much needed skills development. The adolescent, preoccupied with exerting and maintaining control and autonomy, may hold tightly to their coat, rendering our intentions to provide care futile.

So how do we, like the sun, create shifts in awareness and influence change?

The power of reflection

It may be tempting to adopt the roll of cheerleader (“You can do this!”) or problem solver (“Why don’t you try this?”). When an adolescent patient presents with resistant talk (“I don’t want to be here”) or talk that inhibits change (“I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem?”). Often the simplest and most effective way of building rapport and loosening the grasp of resistance is to simply reflect the patient’s message in your own words. Often, patients are primed for persuasion and direction. Reflection statements can contribute to feelings of validation and interpersonal trust.

Resistance as an interpersonal process / Resistance as developmentally appropriate

It is important to keep in mind that resistance is both developmentally appropriate for adolescent patients and an interpersonal process that occurs within the therapeutic alliance. Although, we may expect a certain degree of resistance on a developmental level, we can provide corrective experiences around resistance that still promote autonomy. A clinician may benefit from awareness about the resistance that is brewing in a session, abstain from engaging in a power struggle, and promote an alliance with the patients’s desire for autonomy.

Highlight intrinsic control

An effective technique that facilitates a shift from resistance talk to change talk is the clinician’s emphasis on the patient’s access to her personal control. A clinician may reflect the pros and cons experienced by the patient:

Patient: “I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem? Gosh! That was so hard!”

Therapist: “It sounds like you did well in school this year, but ED made it more difficult.”

A clinician may also reflect a patient’s choice within the constraints of the treatment environment while having the knowledge of the consequences. For example, the patient may be informed of her choice to select what day an exposure is initiated or asked to reflect on her choice to not participate in a group while being aware of consequence of losing a daily privilege as a result.

Shifting focus  

If resistant talk persists, the clinician can shift the focus to another closely relevant therapeutic topic that may tie into the overall theme beneath the resistance. For example, if the patient states, “I don’t want to take medications and that’s final!” the clinician can say, “Ok, how about you tell me how you’re feeling about your overall health today?”

Working with patients experiencing resistance and treatment ambivalence can be challenging. However, there are great opportunities at this treatment phase that can strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the ground work necessary for lasting change. Motivational interviewing and person-centered techniques are an integral component of the clinical work at Clementine adolescent treatment program.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


The Art of Nutrition: the similarities and differences between our three programs philosophies and approaches

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Oliver-Pyatt Centers, Monte Nido and Clementine are three eating disorder treatment programs that operate with the same intention: To support individuals healing from eating disorders and to help them realize their potential of full recovery. That being said, we understand treatment is not a one-size-fits-all formula. Our three directors of nutrition come from the same underlying dietary philosophy that combines medically based research in the treatment of eating disorders with practices that help individuals learn to confidently nourish themselves independently. By understanding the slight differentiators that are practiced in all three facilities, it becomes easy to see that though the day-to-day may differ for clients from facility to facility, the fundamental reasoning for these different practices come from the same place.

Oliver-Pyatt Centers in Miami offers comprehensive, day treatment, transitional living and intensive out-patient programs for women seeking eating disorder recovery. Our program uses thoughtfully planned, supported food exposures to challenge food rituals, beliefs and judgments while building skills and laying the foundational understanding of the role hunger, fullness and satiety play in self-nourishment.  We work with a variety of mindful eating techniques, paying particular attention to hunger and fullness cues, while implementing a medically indicated and individually structured meal plans. Our hope is that this combination lays the groundwork for a future of intuitive eating as our clients move toward full recovery after discharge.

Monte Nido treatment centers offers residential, day and intensive outpatient programming and transitional living for clients seeking eating disorder recovery. At Monte Nido treatment centers, we work with our clients to support their nutritional, physical, and emotional health and wellbeing.  With treatment of the whole person as our guide, our initial goal is to build rapport with our clients, to gain an understanding of an individual’s challenges and to formulate an individualized treatment plan that promotes movement away from eating disorder ideals and towards whole health. Using thoughtfully planned, supported exposures to a variety of food and eating environments, active challenging of eating disorder behaviors, and individualized, structured meal plans, we work with our clients to support the development of the skills required for a life of conscious eating.

Lastly, Clementine is strategically structured for the treatment of adolescents with philosophies that pull from both of its parent programs. Our dietary practices are no exception; nutritional practices are based on research that is aligned with adolescent growth and development. We practice mindful eating techniques before and during meals and reflect after mealtime. There is an emphasis placed on healing the whole family through education, family food exposures and individual work with the family.

While on paper all three programs appear somewhat different, our objectives remain the same. In the next few weeks we’ll dive into the specifics of each program to reveal some more key similarities and differences between the three programs. Our first in-depth look at nutrition will be focused on Monte Nido programs and can be found here.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Treating Eating Disorders in Adolescents: Complexity, Connection and the Course to Full Recovery

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Monte Nido & Affiliates Chief Clinical Officer Doug Bunnell, PhD, FAED, CEDS, Monte Nido & Affiliates Senior Director of East Coast Clinical Programming Melissa Coffin, PhD, CEDS and Clementine adolescent programs Director of Nutrition Services Amanda Mellowspring, MS, RD/N, CEDRD-S will present “Treating Eating Disorders in Adolescents: Complexity, Connection and the Course to Full Recovery” on March 29th and March 30th.

To be effective, treatment of eating disorders has to reflect the complexity of these illnesses. Treating eating disorders in adolescents adds another layer of complexity that requires a deep appreciation for the influences of cognitive, emotional and physiological development. It also requires a thoughtful and systematic approach to helping families support their adolescent’s recovery. This comprehensive model provides a roadmap for helping teens and families establish a quick remission of the acute impact of eating disorder symptoms and behaviors so they can work their way to a full and lasting recovery.

Through this presentation, participants will be able to accurately explain the role of temperament, traits and neurobiology in the etiology maintenance of eating disorder symptoms in adolescents, as well as the psychiatric, psychological, nutritional and medical issues that are unique to this age group. Participants will learn to identify at least three developmental aspects of addressing motivation and readiness for change in the treatment of adolescents and be able to list and explain four skills families can implement to help adolescents develop strategies for managing anxiety and fear. Lastly, participants will learn to define and describe emotional response and attunement, communication and meal support—skills families need to develop when managing the challenge of their teen’s recovery.

Join us on Wednesday, March 29th in New York City at 3 West Club or on Thursday, March 30th in Westchester Country at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel. Registration, networking and breakfast will begin at 8:30 and the presentation will take place from 9:30-11:30am. 2 CEUS will be provided! RSVP to Regional Outreach Manager Jenn Vargas at jvargas@montenidoaffiliates.com.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Article Spotlight

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Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

 

Surviving Spring Break while in Recovery Angie Viets 

Movement Therapy the Supports Weight at Every Size Eating Disorder Hope

On the Importance of Community in the Path Toward Self-Acceptance and Recovery NEDA

Signs of Disordered Eating in Children and Teens Project Heal

5 Strategies to Relieve Anxiety Psychology Today

What I Want Parents to Know about Eating Disorders More Love

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

 


How Are You Teaching Others to Treat You?

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Clementine South Miami Primary Therapist Josephine Wiseheart, MS contributed to an article published on PsychCentral, “What It Means To Teach People How To Treat You.” The full, original article can be accessed here. The article explores the importance of and your own role in teaching others how to treat you. Please enjoy an excerpt of the article below…

Start with yourself.

“[T]o teach people how to treat you, you do not begin with them, you begin with yourself,” said Wiseheart. Morgan agreed: “The way you believe about and treat yourself sets the standard for others on how you demand to be treated. People learn how to treat you based on what you accept from them.”

Wiseheart regularly tells her clients to “Be the pebble.” In other words, “to create even a seemingly small amount of change will ripple out and create more change.”

Teaching others how to treat us starts with self-awareness, Wiseheart said. She suggested asking yourself these questions: “How do I treat myself? What do I value? What do I want? What do I think I deserve?”

Remember that you can’t change anyone else. But we can “create a different reaction in others if we change ourselves,” she said.

Talk about your “rules of engagement.”
One of the biggest misconceptions Wiseheart’s clients have about relationships is that others should know how they want to be treated. However, “in order for people in a relationship to be on the same page, they need to have access to the same instruction manual,” she said.

She calls this manual the “Rules of Engagement.” She suggests having “business meetings” to discuss the “rules” of your relationship. Have these meetings when people are at their best: They aren’t in an emotionally heightened or vulnerable situation, she said.

Rules might include no name calling or yelling during a conversation, and taking a break when tempers flare.

Communicate your needs clearly and compassionately.
For instance, many couples criticize, yell, or give each other the silent treatment to communicate their needs, said Morgan, who practices at Wasatch Family Therapy. This not only is ineffective, but it also hurts your relationship.

“Rather than scream ‘you never listen to me,’ it is more helpful to express ‘I feel alone right now and I would be very grateful if I could have your undivided attention for 10 minutes,’” he said. Another example is: “I am feeling overwhelmed right now and would love it if I could get a few ideas from you.”

In other words, we teach people how to treat us when we can identify a need and then express it in a clear and comprehensible way, Morgan said.

“If we use pouting, desperation, or even abuse, people do not learn how we want to be treated. All they hear is pouting, desperation and screaming. The message does not get across.”

Model how you’d like to be treated.
Wiseheart also often tells clients to “Be the person you want other people to be.” That is, treat others the way you want them to treat you, which is reminiscent of the Golden Rule, she said.

“If you want your children to be kind to you, be kind to them; if you want your sweetheart to be romantic and affectionate with you, be that way with them.” If you want others to listen to you, listen to them. Focus your full attention on the person, maintain eye contact, ask questions, validate their feelings and be empathetic, Wiseheart said.

Reinforce behaviors you like.
Reinforcement simply means expressing appreciation when the other person makes the effort to change their behavior, Wiseheart said. For instance, you might say: “I appreciate that you listened to me so intently yesterday.”

“Reinforce [behaviors you like] at the time, 5 minutes later, 10 minutes later, an hour later, a day later, 10 days later. You cannot reinforce a positive behavior enough.”

Pick a role model to emulate.
“Find a role model of someone who demands respect and appears to have a strong sense of worth,” Morgan said. This person might be a parent, peer, friend, teacher, coach, therapist, mentor or even a well-known celebrity, he said. “The important component of a role model is that they are emulating the desired beliefs and behaviors that you would like to adopt or integrate.”

Have realistic expectations.
According to Wiseheart, “You don’t teach people how to treat you in a day, or a week, or a month; it probably takes many months at a minimum to really get someone to treat you the way that you want to be treated.” This process takes lots of practice and patience. And sometimes, people are too caught up in being rigid and defending their own reality to try to act differently, she said.

When you start clarifying what you will and won’t tolerate there’s also a risk that some people won’t stick around, Wiseheart said. “At that point, you need to ask yourself what’s in your best interest — a relationship at the cost of you, or making room for the future relationships that you deserve?”

For the full article, written by Margarita Tartavosky, MS who writes her own blog, Weightless, please visit here. Marriage and Family Therapist Michael Morgan, of Wasatch Family Therapy, also contributed to the article.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Diagnostic Dilemmas: The Nutritional and Medical Interface in Treating Eating Disorders and Co-morbid Illness

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Clementine Director of Nutrition Services Amanda Mellowspring, MS, RD/N, CEDRD and Chief Medical Officer Joel Jahraus, MD, FAED, CEDS will be sharing some of their expertise in an upcoming professional seminar. “Diagnostic Dilemmas: The Nutritional and Medical Interface in Treating Eating Disorders and Co-morbid Illness” will be held in Princeton, NJ at the Westin Princeton on Friday, March 10th from 9:00am-11:30am. Breakfast and 2 CE hours will provided.

Contemporary medical illnesses including celiac disease, food allergies and irritable bowel syndrome often confound the treatment of eating disorder patients and need careful consideration as to a true medical etiology. Often in the course of treatment the nutritional aspect of care becomes front and center as individuals fear the worst with food exposures that they have long avoided. This presentation will discuss these issues and put forth our model of care in appropriately assessing the comorbidities as well as the collaboration of medical and nutrition in treating not only the co-morbid illness, but the eating disorder as well.

In this presentation, participants will learn to describe three basic medical and nutritional issues inherent to co-morbid medical issues in eating disorder treatment and accurately explain the current medical approach to the treatment of comorbid illnesses. Participants will also learn to describe the interaction of medical and nutritional team members in the assessment and treatment process. Lastly, participants will learn at least two appropriate nutritional approaches that correct nutritional deficiencies while addressing food fears and eating disorder behaviors.

To join the professional seminar, please RSVP to Regional Outreach Manager Tamie Gangloff (tgangloff@montenidoaffiliates.com). Seating is limited.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.