Article Spotlight

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Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

5 Ways Health Education Can Better Portray Living with an Eating Disorder NEDA

Supporting a Friend Fresh Out of Eating Disorder Recovery Eating Disorder Hope

Meditation as the Foundation for Overall Health and Well-Being Huffington Post

What You Need to Know About Stress and Self-Care Psychology Today

Taking Care of Yourself When Your Child Has an Eating Disorder More Love

To the Men and the Boys Who are Struggling with an Eating Disorder Huffington Post

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Monte Nido & Affiliates Trauma Protocol

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Individuals struggling with the aftermath of a traumatic experience require an effective protocol ensuring long lasting results. It is important to specifically ask treatment centers to provide detailed descriptions of their trauma protocol and how they offer this important and sensitive support. At Monte Nido & Affiliates, we offer a clear methodology that will treat trauma patients with care, compassion and practices that work.

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is the chosen model we use at our locations because it has strong empirical research and outcomes. This type of therapy is manualized but still leaves room for flexibility based on the patient’s needs. Features of this treatment include targeting perceived cognitive distortions and challenging the patient through socratic questioning. This type of questioning allows patients to reach conclusions themselves and promotes inner reflection. Somatic experiences, such as mindfulness and yoga, are incorporated into the program as well, although it is not our direct method for treating trauma. The CPT process is also integrated with other modalities such as Dialectal Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

At every location that offers this programming, there is a trained staff member on call. These treatment plans are administered through certified therapists that have undergone extensive training by Dr. Patricia Resick. She has administered national two-day training programs at locations in Malibu, Miami and Briarcliff. Additionally, Dr. Resick continues to check in with supervision calls with the clinicians at our locations to ensure each patient is receiving the best care possible.

Knowing your loved one is struggling with the aftermath of a traumatic experience can be a devastating process and we are here to help ease your pain. If you are ready to take a step toward healing, please visit our admissions page here.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


The Sun and Wind Dispute: Navigating Motivation and Readiness for Change in Adolescents with Eating Disorders

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Clementine Miami Pinecrest Clinical Director Bertha Tavarez, PsyD discusses treating an adolescent who is resistant and treatment ambivalent. Dr. Tavarez offers some strategies to help strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the groundwork necessary for full recovery. 

“The sun and the wind were having a dispute as to who was more powerful. They saw a man walking along and they had a bet as to which of them would get him to remove his coat. The wind started first and blew up a huge gale, the coat flapped but the man only fastened the buttons and tightened up his belt. The sun tried next and shone brightly making the man sweat. He took off his coat.” – Anonymous

The metaphor of the sun and the wind is an accurate depiction of the challenges that many clinicians face while working with adolescent patients. Although we may have access to the gravity of our patient’s clinical needs, simply communicating our concerns and providing much needed skills can be met with resistance. Our patients remain “locked in” to their emotional experience while simultaneously feeling “locked out” of the insight and motivation needed to increase their receptivity to much needed skills development. The adolescent, preoccupied with exerting and maintaining control and autonomy, may hold tightly to their coat, rendering our intentions to provide care futile.

So how do we, like the sun, create shifts in awareness and influence change?

The power of reflection

It may be tempting to adopt the roll of cheerleader (“You can do this!”) or problem solver (“Why don’t you try this?”). When an adolescent patient presents with resistant talk (“I don’t want to be here”) or talk that inhibits change (“I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem?”). Often the simplest and most effective way of building rapport and loosening the grasp of resistance is to simply reflect the patient’s message in your own words. Often, patients are primed for persuasion and direction. Reflection statements can contribute to feelings of validation and interpersonal trust.

Resistance as an interpersonal process / Resistance as developmentally appropriate

It is important to keep in mind that resistance is both developmentally appropriate for adolescent patients and an interpersonal process that occurs within the therapeutic alliance. Although, we may expect a certain degree of resistance on a developmental level, we can provide corrective experiences around resistance that still promote autonomy. A clinician may benefit from awareness about the resistance that is brewing in a session, abstain from engaging in a power struggle, and promote an alliance with the patients’s desire for autonomy.

Highlight intrinsic control

An effective technique that facilitates a shift from resistance talk to change talk is the clinician’s emphasis on the patient’s access to her personal control. A clinician may reflect the pros and cons experienced by the patient:

Patient: “I got straight A’s with ED, what’s the problem? Gosh! That was so hard!”

Therapist: “It sounds like you did well in school this year, but ED made it more difficult.”

A clinician may also reflect a patient’s choice within the constraints of the treatment environment while having the knowledge of the consequences. For example, the patient may be informed of her choice to select what day an exposure is initiated or asked to reflect on her choice to not participate in a group while being aware of consequence of losing a daily privilege as a result.

Shifting focus  

If resistant talk persists, the clinician can shift the focus to another closely relevant therapeutic topic that may tie into the overall theme beneath the resistance. For example, if the patient states, “I don’t want to take medications and that’s final!” the clinician can say, “Ok, how about you tell me how you’re feeling about your overall health today?”

Working with patients experiencing resistance and treatment ambivalence can be challenging. However, there are great opportunities at this treatment phase that can strengthen the therapeutic alliance and build the ground work necessary for lasting change. Motivational interviewing and person-centered techniques are an integral component of the clinical work at Clementine adolescent treatment program.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.