The Art of Nutrition: the similarities and differences between our three programs philosophies and approaches

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Oliver-Pyatt Centers, Monte Nido and Clementine are three eating disorder treatment programs that operate with the same intention: To support individuals healing from eating disorders and to help them realize their potential of full recovery. That being said, we understand treatment is not a one-size-fits-all formula. Our three directors of nutrition come from the same underlying dietary philosophy that combines medically based research in the treatment of eating disorders with practices that help individuals learn to confidently nourish themselves independently. By understanding the slight differentiators that are practiced in all three facilities, it becomes easy to see that though the day-to-day may differ for clients from facility to facility, the fundamental reasoning for these different practices come from the same place.

Oliver-Pyatt Centers in Miami offers comprehensive, day treatment, transitional living and intensive out-patient programs for women seeking eating disorder recovery. Our program uses thoughtfully planned, supported food exposures to challenge food rituals, beliefs and judgments while building skills and laying the foundational understanding of the role hunger, fullness and satiety play in self-nourishment.  We work with a variety of mindful eating techniques, paying particular attention to hunger and fullness cues, while implementing a medically indicated and individually structured meal plans. Our hope is that this combination lays the groundwork for a future of intuitive eating as our clients move toward full recovery after discharge.

Monte Nido treatment centers offers residential, day and intensive outpatient programming and transitional living for clients seeking eating disorder recovery. At Monte Nido treatment centers, we work with our clients to support their nutritional, physical, and emotional health and wellbeing.  With treatment of the whole person as our guide, our initial goal is to build rapport with our clients, to gain an understanding of an individual’s challenges and to formulate an individualized treatment plan that promotes movement away from eating disorder ideals and towards whole health. Using thoughtfully planned, supported exposures to a variety of food and eating environments, active challenging of eating disorder behaviors, and individualized, structured meal plans, we work with our clients to support the development of the skills required for a life of conscious eating.

Lastly, Clementine is strategically structured for the treatment of adolescents with philosophies that pull from both of its parent programs. Our dietary practices are no exception; nutritional practices are based on research that is aligned with adolescent growth and development. We practice mindful eating techniques before and during meals and reflect after mealtime. There is an emphasis placed on healing the whole family through education, family food exposures and individual work with the family.

While on paper all three programs appear somewhat different, our objectives remain the same. In the next few weeks we’ll dive into the specifics of each program to reveal some more key similarities and differences between the three programs. Our first in-depth look at nutrition will be focused on Monte Nido programs and can be found here.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Treating Eating Disorders in Adolescents: Complexity, Connection and the Course to Full Recovery

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Monte Nido & Affiliates Chief Clinical Officer Doug Bunnell, PhD, FAED, CEDS, Monte Nido & Affiliates Senior Director of East Coast Clinical Programming Melissa Coffin, PhD, CEDS and Clementine adolescent programs Director of Nutrition Services Amanda Mellowspring, MS, RD/N, CEDRD-S will present “Treating Eating Disorders in Adolescents: Complexity, Connection and the Course to Full Recovery” on March 29th and March 30th.

To be effective, treatment of eating disorders has to reflect the complexity of these illnesses. Treating eating disorders in adolescents adds another layer of complexity that requires a deep appreciation for the influences of cognitive, emotional and physiological development. It also requires a thoughtful and systematic approach to helping families support their adolescent’s recovery. This comprehensive model provides a roadmap for helping teens and families establish a quick remission of the acute impact of eating disorder symptoms and behaviors so they can work their way to a full and lasting recovery.

Through this presentation, participants will be able to accurately explain the role of temperament, traits and neurobiology in the etiology maintenance of eating disorder symptoms in adolescents, as well as the psychiatric, psychological, nutritional and medical issues that are unique to this age group. Participants will learn to identify at least three developmental aspects of addressing motivation and readiness for change in the treatment of adolescents and be able to list and explain four skills families can implement to help adolescents develop strategies for managing anxiety and fear. Lastly, participants will learn to define and describe emotional response and attunement, communication and meal support—skills families need to develop when managing the challenge of their teen’s recovery.

Join us on Wednesday, March 29th in New York City at 3 West Club or on Thursday, March 30th in Westchester Country at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel. Registration, networking and breakfast will begin at 8:30 and the presentation will take place from 9:30-11:30am. 2 CEUS will be provided! RSVP to Regional Outreach Manager Jenn Vargas at jvargas@montenidoaffiliates.com.

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.


Article Spotlight

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Join us in reading inspirational and informative articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

 

Surviving Spring Break while in Recovery Angie Viets 

Movement Therapy the Supports Weight at Every Size Eating Disorder Hope

On the Importance of Community in the Path Toward Self-Acceptance and Recovery NEDA

Signs of Disordered Eating in Children and Teens Project Heal

5 Strategies to Relieve Anxiety Psychology Today

What I Want Parents to Know about Eating Disorders More Love

 

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine locations with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.

 


How Are You Teaching Others to Treat You?

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Clementine South Miami Primary Therapist Josephine Wiseheart, MS contributed to an article published on PsychCentral, “What It Means To Teach People How To Treat You.” The full, original article can be accessed here. The article explores the importance of and your own role in teaching others how to treat you. Please enjoy an excerpt of the article below…

Start with yourself.

“[T]o teach people how to treat you, you do not begin with them, you begin with yourself,” said Wiseheart. Morgan agreed: “The way you believe about and treat yourself sets the standard for others on how you demand to be treated. People learn how to treat you based on what you accept from them.”

Wiseheart regularly tells her clients to “Be the pebble.” In other words, “to create even a seemingly small amount of change will ripple out and create more change.”

Teaching others how to treat us starts with self-awareness, Wiseheart said. She suggested asking yourself these questions: “How do I treat myself? What do I value? What do I want? What do I think I deserve?”

Remember that you can’t change anyone else. But we can “create a different reaction in others if we change ourselves,” she said.

Talk about your “rules of engagement.”
One of the biggest misconceptions Wiseheart’s clients have about relationships is that others should know how they want to be treated. However, “in order for people in a relationship to be on the same page, they need to have access to the same instruction manual,” she said.

She calls this manual the “Rules of Engagement.” She suggests having “business meetings” to discuss the “rules” of your relationship. Have these meetings when people are at their best: They aren’t in an emotionally heightened or vulnerable situation, she said.

Rules might include no name calling or yelling during a conversation, and taking a break when tempers flare.

Communicate your needs clearly and compassionately.
For instance, many couples criticize, yell, or give each other the silent treatment to communicate their needs, said Morgan, who practices at Wasatch Family Therapy. This not only is ineffective, but it also hurts your relationship.

“Rather than scream ‘you never listen to me,’ it is more helpful to express ‘I feel alone right now and I would be very grateful if I could have your undivided attention for 10 minutes,’” he said. Another example is: “I am feeling overwhelmed right now and would love it if I could get a few ideas from you.”

In other words, we teach people how to treat us when we can identify a need and then express it in a clear and comprehensible way, Morgan said.

“If we use pouting, desperation, or even abuse, people do not learn how we want to be treated. All they hear is pouting, desperation and screaming. The message does not get across.”

Model how you’d like to be treated.
Wiseheart also often tells clients to “Be the person you want other people to be.” That is, treat others the way you want them to treat you, which is reminiscent of the Golden Rule, she said.

“If you want your children to be kind to you, be kind to them; if you want your sweetheart to be romantic and affectionate with you, be that way with them.” If you want others to listen to you, listen to them. Focus your full attention on the person, maintain eye contact, ask questions, validate their feelings and be empathetic, Wiseheart said.

Reinforce behaviors you like.
Reinforcement simply means expressing appreciation when the other person makes the effort to change their behavior, Wiseheart said. For instance, you might say: “I appreciate that you listened to me so intently yesterday.”

“Reinforce [behaviors you like] at the time, 5 minutes later, 10 minutes later, an hour later, a day later, 10 days later. You cannot reinforce a positive behavior enough.”

Pick a role model to emulate.
“Find a role model of someone who demands respect and appears to have a strong sense of worth,” Morgan said. This person might be a parent, peer, friend, teacher, coach, therapist, mentor or even a well-known celebrity, he said. “The important component of a role model is that they are emulating the desired beliefs and behaviors that you would like to adopt or integrate.”

Have realistic expectations.
According to Wiseheart, “You don’t teach people how to treat you in a day, or a week, or a month; it probably takes many months at a minimum to really get someone to treat you the way that you want to be treated.” This process takes lots of practice and patience. And sometimes, people are too caught up in being rigid and defending their own reality to try to act differently, she said.

When you start clarifying what you will and won’t tolerate there’s also a risk that some people won’t stick around, Wiseheart said. “At that point, you need to ask yourself what’s in your best interest — a relationship at the cost of you, or making room for the future relationships that you deserve?”

For the full article, written by Margarita Tartavosky, MS who writes her own blog, Weightless, please visit here. Marriage and Family Therapist Michael Morgan, of Wasatch Family Therapy, also contributed to the article.

For more information about Clementine adolescent treatment programs, please call 855.900.2221, visit our websitesubscribe to our blog, and connect with us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

To visit or tour a Clementine location with one of our clinical leaders, please reach out to a Clementine Admissions Specialist at 855.900.2221.